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I have the following:

var doHandler = function (link, form, close) {
    var $form = form;
    var $link = link;
    var dialogTitle = $form.find("#Title").val();
    // some code
}

I'd like to change this to:

function doTask(??) {
  var dialogTitle = $form.find("#Title").val();
  // some code
}
var doHandler = function (link, form, close) {
    var $form = form;
    var $link = link;
    doTask(??)
}

Can someone explain:

  • what "var $form = form;" is doing
  • what parameter I should pass to doTask $form or form?
  • should that first line in doTask reference $form or form
  • do I need to declare the function before calling if it is in the same file?

Sorry but it's really confusing what is the difference and why the $ is there

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3  
Do you mean $(form) ??? –  powtac Jun 20 '12 at 9:01
    
Yes in particular I don't understand what the line $form = form is doing. Plus some other things I don't understand. –  Anne Jun 20 '12 at 9:03

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The character $ can be used in a variable name just like any other of the valid characters, and a variable name containing a $ has no special meaning in the language.

As the variables for the form and the link are local variables, you have to pass them on to the function to use them.

A function doesn't have to be defined above the code that uses it, as long as it's in the same (or previous) file or the same (or previous) script block.

In the doTask function you use neither the variable form nor the variable $form, as they are both local to the doHandler function. You use the parameter that is sent to the function. This parameter could also be named form or $form, but it could also be named something completely different.

var doHandler = function (link, form, close) {
  var $form = form;
  var $link = link;
  doTask($form, $link);
};

function doTask(someForm, someLink) {
  var dialogTitle = someForm.find("#Title").val();
  // some code
}

It seems pointless to copy the parameters link and form to the local variables $link and $form, though. You could just as well use the parameters:

var doHandler = function (link, form, close) {
  doTask(form, link);
};

function doTask(someForm, someLink) {
  var dialogTitle = someForm.find("#Title").val();
  // some code
}
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What do you think about my prefixing all of the link and form parameters with a dollar because of the naming convention? –  Anne Jun 20 '12 at 9:11
1  
@Anne: A naming convention like that is just a matter of taste. Use whatever you find logical, it's more important to be consistent than to pick the "best" convention. –  Guffa Jun 20 '12 at 9:14

The assignments $form = form seem to do nothing from the code you posted, but it would depend on what // some code does.

The convention of prefixing variable names with $ is used to denote that the variable holds a jQuery object.

If the code instead read

var $form = $(form);

then this would explain everything: $form is a jQuery object that wraps form (which is presumably a plain DOM element).

For your other questions:

  • you should pass doTask whatever parameters it needs to do its job
  • it doesn't matter if doTask precedes doHandler in the source or not
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But can I just specify $form in my parameter list or do I need to specify without the $ and convert in the function? –  Anne Jun 20 '12 at 9:06
    
@Anne: Either of the two will work. But since you already have $form it seems wasteful to pass the bare form and re-wrap it inside doTask. –  Jon Jun 20 '12 at 9:07
    
okay that's the important answer I was looking for. So I'll pass $link and $form in my parameters to doTask. –  Anne Jun 20 '12 at 9:08

That is a naming standard for declaring jQuery objects.

So by assigning a $ you let it now that the variable will hold the result of a jQuery selector for example.

And here is a simple example of how to simplify your flow:

http://jsfiddle.net/YYNeA/16/

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Could I just have done this: var doHandler = function ($link, $form, close) ? –  Anne Jun 20 '12 at 9:05
    
i'll set up an example on jsfiddle for you. –  Bogdan Emil Mariesan Jun 20 '12 at 9:10
var $form = form;
    var $link = link;

these are the variable, which defined. you can declare varibale containing $ in it.

$form is a variable object. if you want to make it as jquery object. surround with jquery.

eg: $(form) //now this is jquery object

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There is nothing special about a $ in your variable name, this can be used for any variable.

However, as @Jon has pointed out, the general convention for prefixing with $ is to declare a jQuery object.

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The $ character is simply a valid character that one can use when defining variables.

I usually use the $ character appended to my variables when the object itself is a jQuery object. Other than that it has no additional information attached to it.

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var $form means you are declaring a variable name $form

var $form = form means you are assigning the form value to your variable $form

same as your $link

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