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I am using Ruby on Rails 3.2.2 and I would like to know what advantages / disadvantages the following code has or could have:

class ApplicationController < ActionController::Base
  before_filter :set_current_user_for_models

  private

  def set_current_user_for_models
    User.current_user = User.find(...) # Find the user from cookies.
  end
end

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :current_user

  private

  def some_method(user)
    if User.current_user == user
      # Make a thing...
    else
      # Make another thing...
    end
  end
end

class Article < ActiveRecord::Base
  def some_method(user)
    if User.current_user == user
      # Make a thing...
    else
      # Make another thing...
    end
  end
end

Have you some advice? How would you improve the code?

Updated after the @tokland comment on the @Wawa Loo answer

Note: the main difference is that User.current_user should be updated also in after_find, after_create, ... model callbacks. Something like this:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :current_user

  after_initialize :some_method

  private

  def some_method
    if User.current_user == self
      # Make a thing...
    else
      # Make another thing...
    end
  end
end

class Article < ActiveRecord::Base
  after_destroy :some_method

  private

  def some_method
    if User.current_user == self.user
      # Make a thing...
    else
      # Make another thing...
    end
  end
end
share|improve this question
    
a model should know about the current user only if you send it as argument to methods. –  tokland Jun 20 '12 at 9:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your code looks fine. I recommend you to read through this rails style guide for an overview on Rails development.

share|improve this answer
    
However, I heard that an approach such that used in the question could "break" the MVC pattern in some way. What do you think about? –  user12882 Jun 20 '12 at 9:14
    
It's hard to give comments. I don't know what you're trying to accomplish here. My suggest is to look open-source RoR project to mimic first then roll your own. For me, the M dealt with database, the C is the middle man between M and V...hope it helps. –  juanitofatas Jun 20 '12 at 9:23
    
"For me, the M dealt with database, the C is the middle man between M and V..." is smart... eheh. I think that, in some way, the ApplicationController is loaded before models and for this the above code could works... hope it helps. –  user12882 Jun 20 '12 at 9:32

I recommend storing the current_user in your session, not as an accessor for the class User. The method set_current_user_for_models will be executed with each request. How does it find the user anyway - User.find(...)?

share|improve this answer
    
I do not use the session because it is not available in model classes. Anyway, it finds the user from cookies. –  user12882 Jun 20 '12 at 9:22
    
@user12882: Send current_user as argument to methods, setting it in the model is conceptually terrible (even if it works). –  tokland Jun 20 '12 at 9:46
    
@tokland - I do not "send current_user as argument to methods" because I can not pass the current_user parameter to callback methods. I updated the question. –  user12882 Jun 20 '12 at 9:59
    
@user12882: I feel your pain, but then you shouldn't create callbacks whose execution depend on current_user. You can always create a method to be called from places (controllers, etc) where the current_user is known. –  tokland Jun 20 '12 at 10:47
    
@Wawa Loo - Why "shouldn't I create callbacks whose execution depend on current_user"? what are pitfalls? –  user12882 Jun 20 '12 at 11:00

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