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In one of my project I'm firing direct query on View using dblink, but after performace check it is observed that it is costly(lot's of Nested Looping, High CPU uses).

Now we have found one solution i.e. Use function to fire those query on view. So is it the right solution or is there any better way to perform this operation.

Sample query and there Performance report:

  1. Without using function:

Query :

SELECT t1.,
       t2.
FROM   table1 t1
       join table2 t2
         ON t1.id = t2.id
WHERE  t1.bookingId = '0250014547' 

Performance Report:

SQL> explain plan for SELECT t1., t2. FROM table1 t1 JOIN table2 t2 ON t1.id = t2.id WHERE t1.bookingId = '0250014547';

SQL> select * from table(dbms_xplan.display);

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                        | Name                     | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT                 |                          |     1 |   331 |     6   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   1 |  NESTED LOOPS                    |                          |     1 |   331 |     6   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   2 |   NESTED LOOPS                   |                          |     1 |   299 |     5   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   3 |    NESTED LOOPS                  |                          |     1 |   210 |     4   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   4 |     NESTED LOOPS                 |                          |     1 |   185 |     3   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   5 |      NESTED LOOPS                |                          |     1 |   156 |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  6 |       TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| GENERAL_ACCT_MAST_TABLE  |     1 |    66 |     1   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  7 |        INDEX UNIQUE SCAN         | IDX_GAM_FORACID          |     1 |       |     1   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   8 |       TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| SERVICE_OUTLET_TABLE     |  1694 |   148K|     1   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  9 |        INDEX UNIQUE SCAN         | IDX_SERVICE_OUTLET_TABLE |     1 |       |     1   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|  10 |      TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID | GEN_SCHM_PARM_TABLE      |   356 | 10324 |     1   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|* 11 |       INDEX UNIQUE SCAN          | IDX_GEN_SCHM_PARM_TABLE  |     1 |       |     1   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|* 12 |     TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID  | ACCT_STATEMENT_TABLE     |    12M|   309M|     1   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|* 13 |      INDEX UNIQUE SCAN           | IDX_ACCT_STATEMENT_TABLE |     1 |       |     1   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|  14 |    TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID   | CUST_MAST_GEN_TABLE      |    24M|  2119M|     1   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|* 15 |     INDEX UNIQUE SCAN            | IDX_CUST_MAST_GEN_TABLE  |     1 |       |     1   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|  16 |   TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID    | BRANCH_BIC_TABLE         | 65258 |  2039K|     1   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|* 17 |    INDEX UNIQUE SCAN             | IDX_BRANCH_BIC_TABLE     |     1 |       |     1   (0)| 00:00:01 |
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  1. Using function:

Query:

SELECT Funquery1('0250014547')
FROM   dual; 

Performance Report:

SQL> explain plan for select gtt('0252050014577') from dual;

SQL> select * from table(dbms_xplan.display);

-----------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation        | Name | Rows  | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
-----------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT |      |     1 |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   1 |  FAST DUAL       |      |     1 |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |
-----------------------------------------------------------------
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and what does Funquery1 do? –  Sathya Jun 20 '12 at 12:48
    
it has same query i have mentioned above which return result in cursor. –  Sham Jun 20 '12 at 13:05
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2 Answers

Does the second query actually run faster?

In general, the SQL optimizer has no idea what goes on inside a function and what goes on inside the function is not part of the query plan. That means that you can hide a great deal of complexity inside the function to make the query plan look more efficient. That does not mean, however, that the query will actually run any faster, use any less CPU, do any fewer I/O operations, etc. If you are putting exactly the same logic inside the function, the query that the function executes will have exactly the same plan as the original query. You'll get the same performance other than the (minor) overhead of a couple extra PL/SQL to SQL context shifts.

Are the statistics on the tables accurate? Are the cardinality estimates in the query plan reasonably close to reality? How selective is the t1.bookingId = '0250014547' predicate? Is bookingID the primary key of t1?

The text of your question talks about a database link but neither the query you posted nor the query plan seem to refer to an object in a remote database. The text of your question talks about a view but the query you posted doesn't refer to any views. The query you posted is joining two tables, the query plan is joining 7. Those sorts of inconsistencies generally make it more complicated to offer any suggestions.

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(Justin) Thanks for the Information.. Since right now we are using UAT server not Production server, so you will not find any dblink, view in above query but in reality query is getting fired on views using dblink. Here bookingID is PRIMARY KEY. –  Sham Jun 21 '12 at 8:03
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Justin (+1) is exactly right. The EXPLAIN PLAN is showing you the call to the function, and is not showing you anything that is happening inside the function.

In SQLPlus, use

set autotrace on

That will give you the actual statistics of the statement execution, including any recursive SQL, which is not shown in the EXPLAIN PLAN output.

For more advanced tuning, you could use Oracle trace event 10046. But the SQLPlus "autotrace" may be sufficient for your purposes.

Tuning statements that involve tables/views on remote databases (via a DB_LINK) can be troublesome, because you have to tune both the statement you submit, AND the statements sent to the remote database.

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