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Hey fellow perl monks,

I'm still wrapping my head around how to correctly dereference. (I read the similar posts prior to posting, but unfortunately am still a bit cloudy on the concept.)

I have the following array, which internally is composed of two arrays. (BTW, I am using strict and warning pragmas.)

use strict; use warnings;
my @a1; my @a2;

where:

@a1 = ( "1MB", "2MB", ... )

and..

@a2 = ( "/home", "/home/debug", ... )

Both @a1 & @a2 are arrays which contain 51 rows. So, I populate these into my 2nd array.

my @b;
push (@b, [ @a1, @a2 ]);

However, when I try to print the results of @b:

sub newl { print "\n"; print "\n"; }
my $an1; my @an1;
$an1 = $#a1;
@an1 = ( 0, 1..$an1 );

for my $i (@an1) { print @b[$i]; &newl; }

I see references to the arrays:

ARRAY(0x81c0a10)
  .
ARRAY(0x81c0a50)
  .
  .
  .

How do I properly print this array? I know I need to dereference the array, I'm not sure how to go about doing this. I tried populating my array as such:

push (@b, [ \@a1, \@a2 ]);

Which produces the same results. I also tried:

for my $i (@an1) { print @{$b[$i]}; &newl; }

Which unfortunately errors due to having 0 as an array reference?

Can't use string ("0") as an ARRAY ref while "strict refs" in use at p_disk_ex6.pl line 42.

Any suggestions are greatly appreciated!

share|improve this question
    
I also tried the following for loop: for my $i (@b) { print @{$i}; &newl; } without any luck. I receive the same error "Can't use string "0" as an array ref while using "strict refs." I'm not sure why I am seeing this error, why is 0 being interpreted as a string? –  slugman Jun 20 '12 at 16:06

3 Answers 3

A short example program, which might help you:

use strict;
use warnings;

my @a1 = qw(1MB 2MB 10MB 7MB);
my @a2 = qw(/foo /bar /flub /blub);

my @b = (\@a1, \@a2);
# equivalent long version:
# my @b = ();
# $b[0] = \@a1;
# $b[1] = \@a2;

for (my $i = 0; $i <= $#a2; $i++) {
    print "a1[$i]: $b[0][$i]\n";
    print "a2[$i]: $b[1][$i]\n";
    print "\n";
}

In your example you were pushin an anoymous arrayref [] into @b. Therefore $b[0] contained the arrayref.

my @b;
push (@b, [ \@a1, \@a2 ]);
# this corresponds to:
# $b[0][0] = \@a1;
# $b[0][1] = \@a2;

In the example where you wrote [@a1, @a2] you were creating an array_ref which contained the joined arrays @a1 and @a2 (first all elements of @a1, and then all elements of @a2):

my @b;
push(@b , [@a1, @a2]);
# $b[0] = ['1MB' , '2MB', '10Mb', '7MB', '/foo', '/bar', '/flub', '/blub']
share|improve this answer

Even Simply this also works

use strict;
use warnings;

my @a1 = qw(1MB 2MB 10MB 7MB);
my @a2 = qw(/foo /bar /flub /blub);

my @b = (@a1, @a2);
print "@b";
share|improve this answer

If you want a general solution that doesn't assume how many elements there are in each of the sub-arrays, and which also allows arbitrary levels of nesting, you're better off using packages that someone else has already written for displaying recursive data structures. A particularly prevalent one is YAML, which you can install if you don't already have it by running cpan:

$ cpan
Terminal does not support AddHistory.

cpan shell -- CPAN exploration and modules installation (v1.9800)
Enter 'h' for help.

cpan[1]> install YAML

Then you can display arbitrary data structures easily. To demonstrate with a simple example:

use YAML;

my @a1 = qw(1MB 2MB 10MB 7MB);
my @a2 = qw(/foo /bar /flub /blub);

my @b = (\@a1, \@a2);

print Dump(\@b);

results in the output

---
-
  - 1MB
  - 2MB
  - 10MB
  - 7MB
-
  - /foo
  - /bar
  - /flub
  - /blub

For a slightly more complicated example

my @b = (\@a1, \@a2,
         { a => 0, b => 1 } );

gives

---
-
  - 1MB
  - 2MB
  - 10MB
  - 7MB
-
  - /foo
  - /bar
  - /flub
  - /blub
- a: 0
  b: 1

To read this, the three "-" characters in column 1 indicate an array with three elements. The first two elements have four sub elements each (the lines with "-" in column 3). The third outer element is a hash reference, since it is made up of "key: value" pairs.

A nice feature about YAML is that you can use it to dump any recursive data structure into a file, except those with subroutine references, and then read it back later using Load.

If you really have to roll your own display routine, that is certainly possible, but you'll have a much easier time if you write it recursively. You can check whether your argument is an array reference or a hash reference (or a scalar reference) by using ref:

my @a1 = qw(1MB 2MB 10MB 7MB);
my @a2 = qw(/foo /bar /flub /blub);

my @b = (\@a1, \@a2,
         { a => 0, b => 1 } );

print_recursive(\@b);
print "\n";

sub print_recursive {
    my ($obj) = @_;

    if (ref($obj) eq 'ARRAY') {
        print "[ ";
        for (my $i=0; $i < @$obj; $i++) {
            print_recursive($obj->[$i]);
            print ", " if $i < $#$obj;
        }
        print " ]";
    }
    elsif (ref($obj) eq 'HASH') {
        print "{ ";
        my @keys = sort keys %$obj;
        for (my $i=0; $i < @keys; $i++) {
            print "$keys[$i] => ";
            print_recursive($obj->{$keys[$i]});
            print ", " if $i < $#keys;
        }
        print " }";
    }
    else {
        print $obj;
    }
}       

which produces the output

[ [ 1MB, 2MB, 10MB, 7MB ], [ /foo, /bar, /flub, /blub ], { a => 0, b => 1 } ]

I have not written my example code to worry about pretty-printing, nor does it handle scalar, subroutine, or blessed object references, but it should give you the idea of how you can write a fairly general recursive data structure dumper.

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