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I'd like to define an abstract method, in order to use this method already in my abstract class. Then, I'd like to have this abstract method defined in different classes that extend my abstract class.

But how could I do this?

(The goal is to provide some basic methods for Integration Tests, that all use the same "structure", but implement some different logic).

How can I define a abstract method WITH parameters in the abstract class, use this abstract method already in abstract class, but implement the method first in my test implementation?

public abstract class BaseIT {
    protected doVerify(String params..) {
        if (isValid()) {
            //basic verification for all extending testcases
        }
    }

    protected abstract boolean isValid(Object o);
}


public class TestA_IT extends BaseIT{
    @Test
    public void myTest {
        //do some specific stuff and verify with resulting params

        doVerify(params..);
    }

    protected boolean isValid(Object o) {
        return o.isValid();
    }   
}

Please bear in mind that this is just a (silly) example of my problem. Of course I could just hand the result of isValid to the base class method, but that's not possibly like this in my specific case.

The problem is: Object o is a different object for the different testcase implementations.

I may not use interfaces for this. How can I make this possible?

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1  
I can't understand the problem clearly. Why exactly can't you override your abstract method? –  Thihara Jun 20 '12 at 10:22
    
Personally, I think you're over complicating this. Keep the tests simple. –  duffymo Jun 20 '12 at 10:23
1  
Instead of showing some (silly) example which is not like your real usecase and which doesn't even compile, why don't you explain what your real use-case is and what you want to achieve? –  JB Nizet Jun 20 '12 at 10:24
    
It could be interesting for you: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visitor_pattern –  Vladislav Bauer Jun 20 '12 at 10:26
    
I am not able to understand the code. Please give a clear example or explain it clearly. –  Kalai Jun 20 '12 at 10:28

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You could do:

public class TestA_IT extends BaseIT {
    @Test
    public void myTest {
        //do some specific stuff and verify with resulting params

        doVerify(params..);
    }

    protected boolean isValid(Object o) {
        return (o instanceOf YourObject) ? ((YourObject)o).isValid() : false;
    }   
}

A cooler way to do this is to implement a Visitor Pattern, but I think you'll be fine like this.

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Ok, visitor pattern is really cool. Nice to know that. But for testing I think templateing oder casting instanceOf seems to be enough. –  membersound Jun 20 '12 at 14:24

Make isValid method receive a BaseIT object and make your TestA_IT extend BaseIT.

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You can define a Template method and then implementation of child classes will define the behavior.

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You can just cast it:

((Class)o).isValid()

But I think the better way is to make a interface which with method isValid(). And make all these object implement to it.

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Your example is confusing because the two classes you show have no inheritance relationship. Until you clarify this, have you looked into making your isValid() method generic and/or having take an object of a type that is an interface with an isValid() method?

At any rate, stay away from solutions that involve casts or instanceof.

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