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Cross-posted at http://perlmonks.org/index.pl?node_id=977333

Given the following hash:

my %hash = (1 => "i", 2 => "j", 3 => "k", 4=> "l");

and input pair

   my @pair  = (1,2);   
   my @pair2 = (2,3);  
   my @pair3 = (1,3);
   my @pair4 = (2,4);

We would like to find keys in %hash where the values is smaller than members of any given pairs.

So the desired output for are:

@pair -> []
@pair2 -> [1]
@pair3 -> [2]
@pair4 -> [1,3]

What's the right algorithm to do that. The following is my code but fail:

sub get_output {
     my ($inputhash,$pair) = @_;

  my @output = ();
  my %done = ();
  foreach my $pr (@{$pair}){
     foreach my $kn (keys %{$inputhash}){
             next if ($pr <= $kn || $done{$kn});
             push @output,$kn;  
             $done{$kn} = 1;

     }
  }

  use Data::Dumper;
  print Dumper \@output;
  return @output;
}
share|improve this question
    
What code? You seemed to have been abducted before you could finish posting your question. –  Dave Cross Jun 20 '12 at 10:26
    
You declare $inputhash but then use $input_hash. You have three { but four } –  cdarke Jun 20 '12 at 10:31
    
@cdarke: corrected. Thanks. –  neversaint Jun 20 '12 at 10:33
    
@neversaint $done{kn} is a different value than $done{$kn}. –  TLP Jun 20 '12 at 10:54
2  
Sorry, I just don't get it. How can we compare 'j', 'k', etc... to numbers (of which the pairs in your example consist)? Why do we have to compare values of hash to each element of pair - and not the minimum one? –  raina77ow Jun 20 '12 at 12:13

1 Answer 1

This is not very efficient but it works. Still don't see the point of the hash given your requested output doesn't involve the hash.:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
my %hash = (1 => "i", 2 => "j", 3 => "k", 4=> "l");
my @pair = (1,2); #tested all your cases and it showed to work
my $it;
my $iterator;
my $sit;
my @occurence;
my @oldpair = @pair;
@occurence =  (0, 0, 0, 0);
foreach(@oldpair)
{
if ($_ == 1)
{
    $occurence[0] += 1;
}
if ($_ == 2)
{
    push(@pair, 1);
    $occurence[0] += 1;
    $occurence[1] += 1;
}
if ($_ == 3)
{
    push(@pair, 2);
    $occurence[1] += 1;
    $occurence[2] += 1;
}
if ($_ == 4)
{
    push(@pair, 3);
    $occurence[2] += 1;
    $occurence[3] += 1;
}
}

foreach $iterator(@occurence)
{
    $it++;
    if ($iterator > 1)
    {
        @pair = grep { $_ != $it } @pair;
    }

}
foreach $sit(@oldpair)
{
    @pair = grep { $_ != $sit } @pair;
}
share|improve this answer
    
print @pair at the end to see –  PinkElephantsOnParade Jun 21 '12 at 13:30

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