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I have FlashcardSchemas and PackageSchemas in my design. One flashcard can belong to different packages and a package can contain different flashcards.

Below you can see a stripped down version of my mongoose schema definitions:

// package-schema.js
var Schema = mongoose.Schema,
    ObjectId = Schema.ObjectId;

var PackageSchema = new Schema({
    id          : ObjectId,
    title       : { type: String, required: true },
    flashcards  : [ FlashcardSchema ]
});

var exports = module.exports = mongoose.model('Package', PackageSchema);

// flashcard-schema.js
var Schema = mongoose.Schema,
    ObjectId = Schema.ObjectId;

var FlashcardSchema = new Schema({
    id      : ObjectId,
    type        : { type: String, default: '' },
    story       : { type: String, default: '' },
    packages    : [ PackageSchema ]
});

var exports = module.exports = mongoose.model('Flashcard', FlashcardSchema);

As you can see from the comments above, these two schema definitions belong to separate files and reference each other.

I get an exception stating that PackageSchema is not defined, as expected. How can I map a many-to-many relation with mongoose?

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1  
There's no straightforward way to do this- why are you having packages part of the flashcard schema, and flashcards part of the package schema? what queries are you expecting to run? –  Alex Jun 20 '12 at 12:03
    
When I pull a package from the db, I want to populate the cards array and when I pull a card from the db, I want to see which packages that the card belongs. If there is not a straightforward way to do this, should I use a third schema function to store these relations? –  Élodie Petit Jun 20 '12 at 13:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You are doing it the right way, however the problem is that you have to include PackageSchema in the the flashcard-schema.js, and vice-versa. Otherwise these files have no idea what you are referencing

var Schema = mongoose.Schema,
    ObjectId = Schema.ObjectId;
    PackageSchema = require('./path/to/package-schema.js')

var FlashcardSchema = new Schema({
    id      : ObjectId,
    type        : { type: String, default: '' },
    story       : { type: String, default: '' },
    packages    : [ PackageSchema ]
});
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1  
Won't this result in infinite recursion as each require() loads the other? –  Tony O'Hagan Dec 21 '12 at 13:17
2  
@TonyOHagan no, Node handles the require cycle as explained on nodejs.org/api/all.html#all_cycles –  FGM Jul 13 '13 at 6:28

I am new to node, mongo and mongoose but i think the proper way to do this is:

var PackageSchema = new Schema({
    id          : ObjectId,
    title       : { type: String, required: true },
    flashcards  : [ {type : mongoose.Schema.ObjectId, ref : 'Flashcard'} ]
});

var FlashcardSchema = new Schema({
    id      : ObjectId,
    type        : { type: String, default: '' },
    story       : { type: String, default: '' },
    packages    : [ {type : mongoose.Schema.ObjectId, ref : 'Package'} ]
});

That way you only store the object reference and not an embeded object

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1  
    
Good job finding this link @Ruairi –  gtsouk Mar 7 at 20:21

You could use the Schema.add() method to avoid the forward referencing problem.

This (untested) solution puts the schema in one .js file

models/index.js

var Schema = mongoose.Schema,
    ObjectId = Schema.ObjectId;

// avoid forward referencing
var PackageSchema = new Schema();
var FlashcardSchema = new Schema();

PackageSchema.add({
    id          : ObjectId,
    title       : { type: String, required: true },
    flashcards  : [ FlashcardSchema ]
});

FlashcardSchema.add({
    id      : ObjectId,
    type        : { type: String, default: '' },
    story       : { type: String, default: '' },
    packages    : [ PackageSchema ]
});

// Exports both types
module.exports = {
    Package:   mongoose.model('Package', PackageSchema),
    Flashcard: mongoose.model('Flashcard', FlashcardSchema)
};  
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You're thinking of this too much like a relational data store. If that's what you want, use MySQL (or another RDBMS)

Failing that, then yes, a third schema could be used, but don't forget it'll still only be the id of each object (no joins, remember) so you'll still have to retrieve each other item in a separate query.

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The only place I have to think of this like a relational dbms is this package-card scenario. Otherwise, you are absolutely right. –  Élodie Petit Jun 21 '12 at 14:09

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