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I need to read a file line by line, and change a variable accordingly. I would normally write this in PHP... but I decided to take the challenge.

I wrote:

fs = require('fs');
Lazy = require('lazy');
path = require('path');

files = fs.readdirSync('.');
var software = {};


files.forEach( function(fileName){


  var m; 
  if( m = fileName.match(/^(.*)\.txt$/) ){
    name = m[1];

    console.log("Processing file: " + fileName);
    software[name] = {};
    console.log("Software 1: %j",software);

    var section = 'unset';
    new Lazy(fs.createReadStream(fileName)).lines.forEach(
      function(line){
        var m;
        line = line + '';
        if( m = line.match(/^([a-zA-Z_]*):$/)){
          section = m[1];
          software[name][section] = '';
          console.log("Switching to section " + m[1]);
          console.log("Software 2: %j",software);
        } else if (line == '.'){
          section = 'unset'
        } else if (line == ''){
          section = 'unset'
        } else { 
          console.log("LINE: " + line) ;
          software[name][section] = software[name][section] + line + "\n";
          console.log("Software 3: %j",software);
        }
      }

    );   
  }

});

console.log("Software 4: %j",software);

Apart from the code being very ugly and very unoptimised, I am having trouble as when the last line prints, the "software" variable is not YET populated! I am guessing Lazy is asyncronous. So, it basically works, but "at some point later". This is great, but... where do I write code when that important cycle, that fills in the software variable, is actually finished?!?

As requested: data to play with!

simply create "something.txt" and write:

name:
Name 1
.

Option 1:
Value 1
.

Option 2:
Value 2
.

Option 3:
Multi
Line
Value
.

Another_section:
Again
.

Merc.

share|improve this question
    
Good question! Could you give me some short example data to play with? –  jsalonen Jun 20 '12 at 11:09
    
I mean, I could store fs.createReadStream(fileName)).lines.length and increase a counter for each line and then when the number of line is reached call a function... but it seems completely crazy to do. SURELY! –  Merc Jun 20 '12 at 11:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The instances of Lazy returned by the library are EventEmitters, and it emits en event called pipe when a "set" of operations is complete:

new Lazy(
  ...
).on('pipe', function() {
  // all done
});

Modifying your code to use this event results in (the only change is near the bottom):

fs = require('fs');
Lazy = require('lazy');
path = require('path');

files = fs.readdirSync('.');
var software = {};


files.forEach( function(fileName){


  var m;
  if( m = fileName.match(/^(.*)\.txt$/) ){
    name = m[1];

    console.log("Processing file: " + fileName);
    software[name] = {};
    console.log("Software 1: %j",software);

    var section = 'unset';
    new Lazy(fs.createReadStream(fileName)).lines.forEach(
      function(line){
        var m;
        line = line + '';
        if( m = line.match(/^([a-zA-Z_]*):$/)){
          section = m[1];
          software[name][section] = '';
          console.log("Switching to section " + m[1]);
          console.log("Software 2: %j",software);
        } else if (line == '.'){
          section = 'unset'
        } else if (line == ''){
          section = 'unset'
        } else {
          console.log("LINE: " + line) ;
          software[name][section] = software[name][section] + line + "\n";
          console.log("Software 3: %j",software);
        }
      }

    ).on('pipe', function() {
      console.log("Software 4: %j",software);
    });
  }

});

[Edit] To answer your question regarding how I found this info:

I did indeed check out the source file for the project; I knew the library had a sum method that could be chained to instances of Lazy to sum up everything at the end; the code for that method calls foldr, and the code for that method listens for an event called pipeName, which is defaulted in line 22 as pipe.

share|improve this answer
    
I have to ask... how did you find out?!? I read Lasy's docs, and didn't figure it out from there. THere isn't much in there in terms of "pipe" or "event" or "emit" either... I mean, how did you find this out? Did you have to dive into the source code? –  Merc Jun 20 '12 at 11:34
1  
Yeah, I agree the docs aren't very comprehensive; I greatly prefer async as my flow control library of choice. I've updated my answer with some additional info. –  Brandon Tilley Jun 20 '12 at 11:40
    
Btw. thanks for the tip. async seems really nice! –  jsalonen Jun 20 '12 at 11:41
    
OK but my question stands... how did you find out?!? :D –  Merc Jun 20 '12 at 11:42
    
@Merc: He added explanation to the end of his answer. –  jsalonen Jun 20 '12 at 11:43

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