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I have a dataframe with some boolean values (1/0) as follows (sorry I couldn't work out how to make this into a smart table)

       Flag1.Sam Flag2.Sam Flag3.Sam Flag1.Ted Flag2.Ted Flag3.Ted
probe1         0         1         0         1         0         0
probe2         0         0         0         0         0         0
probe3         1         0         0         0         0         0
probe4         0         0         0         0         0         0
probe5         1         1         0         1         0         0

I have 64 samples (Sam/Ted....etc) which are in a list called files i.e;

files <- c("Sam", "Ted", "Ann", ....) 

And I would like to create a a column summing the flag values for each sample to create the following:

               Sam Ted 
probe1.flagsum   1   1
probe2.flagsum   0   0 
probe3.flagsum   1   0 
probe4.flagsum   0   0
probe5.flagsum   2   1

I am fairly new to R, trying to learn on a need to know basis but I have tried the following:

for(i in files) {
    FLAGS$i <- cbind(sapply(i, function(y) { 
        #greping columns to filter for one sample
        filter1 <- grep(names(filters), pattern=y)
        #print out the summed values for those columns  
        FLAGS$y <-rowSums(filters[,(filter1)])
    }
}

The above code does not work and I am bit lost as how to move forward.

Can anyone help me untangle this problem or point me in the right direction of the commands/tools to use.

Thank you.

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2  
Please don't start your questions with "R: "; that is what the tags are for –  Gavin Simpson Jun 20 '12 at 13:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is easily doable in base R reshape, though using the reshape or reshape2 packages might be more intuitive.

Here's a solution in base R:

# Here's your data in its current form
dat = read.table(header=TRUE, text="Flag1.Sam Flag2.Sam   Flag3.Sam   Flag1.Ted   Flag2.Ted   Flag3.Ted
probe1 0   1   0   1   0   0
probe2 0   0   0   0   0   0
probe3 1   0   0   0   0   0
probe4 0   0   0   0   0   0
probe5 1   1   0   1   0   0")
# Generate an ID row
dat$id = row.names(dat)
# Reshape wide to long
r.dat = reshape(dat, direction="long", 
                timevar="probe", 
                varying=1:6, sep=".")
# Calculate row sums
r.dat$sum = rowSums(r.dat[3:5])
# Reshape back to wide format, dropping what you're not interested in
reshape(r.dat, direction="wide", 
        idvar="id", timevar="probe", 
        drop=3:5)
##                id sum.Sam sum.Ted
## probe1.Sam probe1       1       1
## probe2.Sam probe2       0       0
## probe3.Sam probe3       1       0
## probe4.Sam probe4       0       0
## probe5.Sam probe5       2       1

More than one way to skin a cat

You can also whip up a function like this one:

myFun = function(data, varnames) {
  temp = vector("list", length(varnames))
  for (i in 1:length(varnames)) {
    temp[[i]] = colSums(t(dat[grep(varnames[i], names(data))]))
    names(temp)[[i]] = varnames[i]
  }
  data.frame(temp)
}

Then, making use of the vector that you have of names:

files = c("Sam", "Ted")
myFun(dat, files)
##        Sam Ted
## probe1   1   1
## probe2   0   0
## probe3   1   0
## probe4   0   0
## probe5   2   1

Enjoy!

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you this works nicely when I try it on the example data. I am going to run it now on my considerably larger real data. I really appreciate the detailed response. –  jksl Jun 20 '12 at 14:15
    
@jksl, sure. Let us know how it works out. Also, if anything works for you or helps you out in the process of figuring your problem out, remember to vote it up to let other's know what worked for you. –  Ananda Mahto Jun 20 '12 at 16:23
    
Yes it works on the large dataset as does the script by plannapus. I don't seem to have the reputation points to vote up but I have clicked the green ticks if that helps. –  jksl Jun 21 '12 at 13:29

If filters is your input matrix and FLAGS your desired output matrix then I would (naïvely) do something like this:

FLAGS <- matrix(0,nrow=nrow(filters),ncol=length(files))
for(i in 1:length(files)){
    grep(files[i],colnames(filters)) -> index
    FLAGS[,i] <- rowSums(filters[,index])
    }
colnames(FLAGS) <- files
share|improve this answer
    
Great! This works beautifully on my real data. Thanks for such a speedy response. –  jksl Jun 20 '12 at 14:24

assuming your matrix is called input

input <- matrix(rbinom(30, 1, 0.5), ncol = 6)
colnames(input) <- c("F1.S", "F2.S", "F3.S", "F1.T", "F2.T", "F3.T")
rownames(input) <- paste("probe", 1:5, sep = "")
input <- as.data.frame(input)

library(reshape)
input$probe <- rownames(input)
Molten <- melt(input, id.vars = "probe")
Molten$ID <- gsub("^.*\\.", "", levels(Molten$variable))[Molten$variable]
cast(probe ~ ID, data = Molten, fun = "sum")

update with the dat frame from mrdwab

dat = read.table(header=TRUE, text="Flag1.Sam Flag2.Sam   Flag3.Sam   Flag1.Ted   Flag2.Ted   Flag3.Ted
probe1 0   1   0   1   0   0
probe2 0   0   0   0   0   0
probe3 1   0   0   0   0   0
probe4 0   0   0   0   0   0
probe5 1   1   0   1   0   0")

library(reshape)
dat$probe <- rownames(dat)
Molten <- melt(dat, id.vars = "probe")
Molten$ID <- gsub("^.*\\.", "", levels(Molten$variable))[Molten$variable]
cast(probe ~ ID, data = Molten, fun = "sum")
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for such a quick response. I tried this with the test data and the output is not as I expected. I am trying to total/sum the values of all the flags per person/sample in a new column for each sample. Sorry if my explanation was lacking. –  jksl Jun 20 '12 at 14:11
    
That is strange because with the dataset of mrdwab, I get exactly the output you requested. Notice that I only changed the data set. –  Thierry Jun 20 '12 at 14:26
    
Sorry! I will try it again, maybe I did something off. –  jksl Jun 20 '12 at 14:52
1  
@jksl, Thierry's original solution worked just fine. Thierry was just working with some made up data since you didn't provide your problem in an easily reproducible format. Refer to this post for some tips on how you can post more effective questions in the future.... –  Ananda Mahto Jun 20 '12 at 16:28
    
Thanks for the advice. I can't remember exactly what I did now,I think I used my own test data (not at work today) but I ended up with a long table ("Molten") with the information lengthways (terrible explanation I realise. Anyway, as I said I'm sure I did something funny or just copied something in wrongly. Thanks again. –  jksl Jun 21 '12 at 13:28

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