Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm building a class with amongst others a dictionary with integer keys and list values. Adding values to this dictionary seems to be a real bottleneck though and I was wondering whether there might be some way to speed up my code.

class myClass():

  def __init__(self):
    self.d = defaultdict(list)

  def addValue(self, index, value):
    self.d[index].append(value)

Is this really the optimal way of doing this? I don't really care about the order of the values, so perhaps there is a more suitable data structure out there with a faster append. Then again, 'append' doesn't seem to be the main problem, because if I simply append to an empty list, the code is a lot faster. I guess it's the loading of the previously stored list that takes up most of the time?


I found out that the problem is not in the dict, but in the list append (although I claimed otherwise in my original post, for which I apologize). This problem is due to a bug in Python's garbage collector, which is well explained on this other question. Disabling the gc before adding all the values and then re-enabling it, speeds up the process immensely!

share|improve this question
2  
Adding items to a list and getting values from a object or a dict all take no time. To speed up a program you find the bottleneck by profiling, not by changing random pieces of code. – Jochen Ritzel Jun 20 '12 at 12:26
    
Is mapping items to existing keys significantly faster than adding values to new keys? – Adam Matan Jun 20 '12 at 12:35
    
I just found out that the problem is not in the dict, but in the list append (although I claimed otherwise in my original post, for which I apologize). Then I found the answer to my question on stackoverflow.com/questions/2473783/…. Since I'm new to this site, I don't know what the standard procedure is in this case: should I remove my original post? Or add the above details and answer to the post? – niefpaarschoenen Jun 20 '12 at 12:45

Compare it to this:

class myClass():

  def __init__(self):
    self.d = {}

  def addValue(self, index, value):
    self.d.setdefault(index, []).append(value)
share|improve this answer
1  
Out of curiosity, why is this faster? I'd have thought defaultdict does something very similar behind the scenes. – Lauritz V. Thaulow Jun 20 '12 at 12:02
1  
After a short test I found out this is not faster. I just like it better. – eumiro Jun 20 '12 at 12:06
    
I think it actually does the same behind the scenes; timings are similar in any case... I prefer the defaultdict though, because in general you have to type less. – niefpaarschoenen Jun 20 '12 at 12:19

They say "Better to ask for forgiveness than for permission.". Now you're not asking for permission personally, but I thought maybe defaultdict does, and that's what slowing it down.

try this:

class myClass():

  def __init__(self):
    self.d = {}

  def addValue(self, index, value):
    try:
        self.d[index].append(value)
    except KeyError:
        self.d[index] = [value]

This tries to access the index key in the dictionary, if it doesn't exist it will raise a KeyError, and act upon it.

Is it any faster?

share|improve this answer
    
I've tried to compare your code and code from question (using timeit). I've used this test: my = myClass() my.addValue(3, "ab") my.addValue(3, "cd") my.addValue(4, "ef") my.addValue(4, "gh") And original code is faster! On my machine 24.66 usec for your code and 18.10 usec for code from question. So looks like this approach is not the answer.. – stalk Jun 20 '12 at 12:37
1  
Seems that you have the fastest solution then :) – jadkik94 Jun 20 '12 at 12:42
up vote 0 down vote accepted

As a conclusion I can say that my code in the original question is faster than or as fast as all the other suggestions.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.