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I have a script which similar to this:

foo.php

class Foo
{
    function Foo() {
        $Registry = array();
        include 'bar.php';
        $Registry['bar'] = new Bar();
    }
}

bar.php

class Bar
{
    function Bar() {
        global $Registry;
        print_r(var_dump($Registry));
    }
}

but that returns:

array
  'Registry' => &null

Does anyone have any suggestions as to why it's not identifying the Registry variable as an array?

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1  
Take it as an advise given by PHP to drop the use of global :-) –  PeeHaa Jun 20 '12 at 12:24
    
Why do you do this? I'm sure my eyes would hurt if I saw some diagrams of your system architecture :| –  Emil Vikström Jun 20 '12 at 12:28
    
@EmilVikström Diagram? Architecture? ;-) –  PeeHaa Jun 20 '12 at 12:29
    
I suggest you start watching the Google Clean Code Talks. –  PeeHaa Jun 20 '12 at 12:33
1  
You need to inject it as parameter either in the class constructor or in the methods that need them. –  PeeHaa Jun 20 '12 at 13:01
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

you have to create $register global and outside of your class

$Registry = array();

class Foo
{
  function Foo() {
    global $Registry;
    include 'bar.php';
    $Registry['bar'] = new Bar();
  }
}

bar.php

class Bar
{
  function Bar() {
    global $Registry;
    print_r(var_dump($Registry));
  }
}
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Try global in both functions, perhaps.

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Because $Registry does not exist, Foo->Registry exists, but that should be access from the object itself.

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