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I have this function which is supposed to set a certain time format to the given char*:

static void timeStamp(char* time)
{
  time(&strTime);<---ERROR
  curTime = std::localtime(&strTime);
  strftime(time, 8, "%H:%M::", curTime);    
}

strTime and curTime were declared like this:

tm* curTime; 
time_t strTime;

but for some reason i get:

called object type 'char*' is not a function or function pointer

on the marked place.

any idea why?

im using xCode by the way.

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1  
That is the reason why std::time(&tm) (as opposed to time(&tm)) is preferable. –  Nawaz Jun 20 '12 at 12:38
    
@Nawaz At last in C++. The OP should tell us if hw wants to use C or C++. –  glglgl Jun 20 '12 at 12:54

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Your function parameter time is a pointer to a char.

However, in your function body, you're trying to treat it if it were a function that you can call. That's what the error is saying...

the object of type char * is not a function or a function pointer [therefore, I can't call it!]

Essentially, you've hidden the time function by having a local variable of the same name. I'd recommend changing your function parameter's name.

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The function parameter

static void timeStamp(char* time)
{
  time(&strTime);<---ERROR
  // ...
}

shadows the time() function. Rename the parameter.

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You can also do it by having time declared as an extern function inside a different scope in your function, if you'd like. –  Richard J. Ross III Jun 20 '12 at 12:27
    
@RichardJ.RossIII That should be the job of the header files. –  glglgl Jun 20 '12 at 12:28
    
@glglgl no, not when you have a variable with the same name. obviously you haven't read the docs for extern... –  Richard J. Ross III Jun 20 '12 at 12:30
2  
I have read them, and I just don't consider it a good way to solve the problem this way. I explained it above. –  glglgl Jun 20 '12 at 12:31
    
Nice, short explanation. Good job. Seems to me that this is a flaw in C++... why are functions in the same namespace as variables, but either way, good job. –  ArtOfWarfare Feb 1 '13 at 17:53
static void timeStamp(char* time)  

here, this char* time parameter is hidding the function time().you will need to rename it.

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You have redefined the symbol time, to fix, try the following:

static void timeStamp(char *time)
{
    time_t strTime;

    { // brackets here are important!
        extern time_t time(time_t *);
        time(&strTime);
    }

    // ...
}

We add brackets here to add additional scope to the function, and then we tell the compiler that hey, in this block, time is not a variable, its a function, and that allows the compiler to work fine with your current variable name, as well.

Optionally, you can also use the global namespace specifier, like this:

static void timeStamp(char *time)
{
    ::time(&strTime);
    // ...
}
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@Downvoter please explain. This is completely valid, and works just fine. –  Richard J. Ross III Jun 20 '12 at 12:28
    
Not a good idea, IMO. What if an implementation chooses to have it as a stdcall, or whatever implementations use to do? IMO these kinds of declarations should strictly reside in header files. –  glglgl Jun 20 '12 at 12:29
    
@glglgl this is the required practice in C, which the OP tagged the question as. While yes, time is declared in the headers, it is also needed by the standard library, and when that changes, and my code breaks, you can come back to me and tell me my code is wrong. –  Richard J. Ross III Jun 20 '12 at 12:31
2  
I perfectly can imagine a library which declares time as time_t stdcall time(time_t *) instead of cdecl which is the default. And this is a perfect way to mix up your stack, and no compiler warning will notify you. And even if that doesn't happen, IMO this solution is inferior to just renaming the parameter. –  glglgl Jun 20 '12 at 12:35
    
@glglgl did you happen to read the REST of my answer? I added a note about using the global namespace in C++. No, I think not. –  Richard J. Ross III Jun 20 '12 at 12:37

The function time is also the name of your parameter to timeStamp function. The compiler tries to call the char* parameter as if it were a function.

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Because time is a char* which you cannot call - look at your parameter list.

Just rename that and your problem will be gone.

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