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how can we XOR hex numbers in python eg. I want to xor 'ABCD' to '12EF'. answer should be B922.

i used below code but it is returning garbage value

def strxor(a, b):     # xor two strings of different lengths
 if len(a) > len(b):
    return "".join(["%s" % (ord(x) ^ ord(y)) for (x, y) in zip(a[:len(b)], b)])
else:
    return "".join(["%s" % (ord(x) ^ ord(y)) for (x, y) in zip(a, b[:len(a)])])

key ='12ef'
m1='abcd'
print  strxor(key,m1)
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1  
Just a hint for zip: it does the stripping of the longer argument automatically. Anyway, @unwind is right with his short solution. –  eumiro Jun 20 '12 at 12:37
    
I just want to point out that this code is taken from Stanford's Cryptography class on Coursera. The original poster didn't realize it, but his problem was not with the code. His problem was that he didn't recognize that the interpreter was giving him non-English ASCII in response. –  user2044503 Feb 5 '13 at 19:47
    
What might "non-English ASCII" mean? There's no such thing. –  alexis Oct 4 '14 at 13:32
    

4 Answers 4

Whoa. You're really over-complicating it by a very long distance. Try:

>>> print hex(0x12ef ^ 0xabcd)
0xb922

You seem to be ignoring these handy facts, at least:

  • Python has native support for hexadecimal integer literals, with the 0x prefix.
  • "Hexadecimal" is just a presentation detail; the arithmetic is done in binary, and then the result is printed as hex.
  • There is no connection between the format of the inputs (the hexadecimal literals) and the output, there is no such thing as a "hexadecimal number" in a Python variable.
  • The hex() function can be used to convert any number into a hexadecimal string for display.

If you already have the numbers as strings, you can use the int() function to convert to numbers, by providing the expected base (16 for hexadecimal numbers):

>>> print int("12ef", 16)
4874

So you can do two conversions, perform the XOR, and then convert back to hex:

>>> print hex(int("12ef", 16) ^ int("abcd", 16))
0xb922
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4  
Of course if @pratibha only has string literals then an alternative is hex(int('12ef', 16) ^ int('abcd', 16)) –  Jon Clements Jun 20 '12 at 12:36
    
@unwind, the second number should be 0xabcd, hence the expected answer of 0xB922. –  DaV Jun 20 '12 at 12:40
    
hi, thanks for reply. however i got it working like below: –  pratibha Jun 20 '12 at 12:41
    
@DaV Thanks, fixed. –  unwind Jun 20 '12 at 12:44

If the two hex strings are the same length and you want a hex string output then you might try this.

def hexxor(a, b):    # xor two hex strings of the same length
    return "".join(["%x" % (int(x,16) ^ int(y,16)) for (x, y) in zip(a, b)])
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here's a better function

def strxor(a, b):     # xor two strings of different lengths
    if len(a) > len(b):
        return "".join([chr(ord(x) ^ ord(y)) for (x, y) in zip(a[:len(b)], b)])
    else:
        return "".join([chr(ord(x) ^ ord(y)) for (x, y) in zip(a, b[:len(a)])])
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5  
Looks like the exact code from one of the assignments in Crypto 1 course on Coursera. ;) –  Rahil Arora Mar 10 '14 at 3:48

If the strings are the same length, then I would go for '%x' % () of the built-in xor (^).

Examples -

>>>a = '290b6e3a'
>>>b = 'd6f491c5'
>>>'%x' % (int(a,16)^int(b,16))
'ffffffff'
>>>c = 'abcd'
>>>d = '12ef'
>>>'%x' % (int(a,16)^int(b,16))
'b922'

If the strings are not the same length, truncate the longer string to the length of the shorter using a slice longer = longer[:len(shorter)]

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