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I'm attempting to create a procedure that will be running on the server every 1 min(more or less). I know I could achieve it with a cronjob but I'm concerned, let's say I have about 1000 tasks (1000 users that the system would need to check every 1 min), wouldn't it kill the server?

This system is supposed to sync data from google adwords API and do something with it. for example it should read a campaign from google and every 1000 impressions or clicks it should do something. So obviously I need to keep running a connection to adwords api to see the stats on real time. Imagine this procedure needs to run with 1000 registered users.

What technology should I use in my case when I need to run a heavy loop every 1 min? Thanks a lot, Oron

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It depends on what the task is, and the OS. What is the OS, and can you tell us more about the task? –  Jonathan M Jun 20 '12 at 12:43
    
Yes, please... need more info. –  Karthik Kumar Viswanathan Jun 20 '12 at 12:43
    
First of all, thanks a lot. I'll try to explain the behavior of the system I need. This system is supposed to sync data from google adwords API and do something with it. for example it should read a campaign from google and every 1000 impressions or clicks it should do something. So obviously I need to keep running a connection to adwords api to see the stats on real time. Imagine this procedure needs to run with 1000 registered users. Thanks, Oron –  user1469227 Jun 20 '12 at 13:15

4 Answers 4

Ideally, if you're using a distributed workflow, you are better off servicing multiple users this way.

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While there are many technologies available at your disposal, it's difficult to pinpoint any specific one that will be useful when you haven't given enough sufficient information.

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First of all, thanks a lot. I'll try to explain the behavior of the system I need. This system is supposed to sync data from google adwords API and do something with it. for example it should read a campaign from google and every 1000 impressions or clicks it should do something. So obviously I need to keep running a connection to adwords api to see the stats on real time. Imagine this procedure needs to run with 1000 registered users. Thanks, Oron –  user1469227 Jun 20 '12 at 13:15

There are 2 fundamental issues with what you are trying to do, the first one more severe than the other.

What you can do is to pick a timeframe (e.g. once every 2 hours) for which you want to run reports, and then stick to that schedule. To give you a rough estimate, you could run 10 reports in parallel, and assuming it takes 10 seconds to download and parse a report (which gives you a throughput of 1 report / second, but this strictly depends on your internet connection speed, load on AdWords API servers, how big your clients are, what columns and segmentation and date ranges you are requesting the data for, etc. For big clients, the timing could easily run into several minutes per report), you could refresh 1000 accounts only in 20-30 minutes' time.

My advise is to ask this question on the official forum for Adwords API - https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups#!forum/adwords-api. You will definitely find users who have tackled similar issues before.

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you can safe a variable which contains a timestamp of the last run of your loop. now when a user visits your page, check if your timestamp is older than 1 minute. If he is older run your loop and check all user.

so your loop runs only when there are users on your site. this saves a lot of server performance.

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... and would use/waste the server resources at the only moment you really want them, handling a request. –  smassey Jun 20 '12 at 13:01

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