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This is the function I use in OpenEdge 10.1B to encrypt a string with AES-128 OFB:

 DEFINE VAR cRes AS CHAR INITIAL ? NO-UNDO.
 DEFINE VAR rKey AS RAW NO-UNDO.
 DEFINE VAR rEnc AS RAW NO-UNDO

 rKey = GENERATE-PBE-KEY(cEncKey).

 eEnc = ENCRYPT(cData, rKey, ?, "AES_OFB_128").
 cRes = BASE64-ENCODE(rEnc) NO-ERROR.

 IF ERROR-STATUS::ERROR THEN cRes = ?.

 return cRes.

This function does encrypt well.

When I want to decrypt this with the following PHP, it fails, e.g. it gives me a different result than the original string.

// decrypted: original string is supposed to have 33 characters
$encrypted = "YnRvNjIG1kj1QtUM9ZYuVYS3D4LBYCEsprjg2QCaD/eM";
$key = "27Zkp6Wq";

$method = 'aes-128-ofb';

# do decryption
echo "<pre>".openssl_decrypt(base64_decode($encrypted), $method, $key, false)."</pre>";

I understand that might have something to do with the GENERATE-PBE-KEY function, but I fail to see how I can generate an PCKS#5 key in PHP.

Can someone please help me?

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Shouldn't the method read AES-128-OFB in the PHP ? –  Alex W Jun 20 '12 at 13:12
    
Also, you should make sure you are setting a consistent character encoding in OpenEdge and PHP –  Alex W Jun 20 '12 at 13:13
    
aes-128-ofb is acceptable (see php.net/manual/de/function.openssl-get-cipher-methods.php) - but just for the sake of it - the result is the exact same to the UPPERCASE version. –  Martin Hohenberg Jun 20 '12 at 13:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This was too long for a comment. A few things to look at:

  1. The fourth parameter of openssl_decrypt should be true OR the first parameter should be left base64 encoded. Unless it was double base64 encoded :)

  2. Is the key base64 encoded or is that the raw key?

  3. From the OpenEdge it's not entirely clear whether PBES1 (pbkdf1) or PBES2 (pbkdf2) is applied to the key, but the default settings use sha1 as the hash algorithm, no salt and 1000 as the iteration count. You can find example PHP implementations online.

Having fiddled with your example I couldn't get it to work, but the above should lead you in the right direction; btw, when I tried doing the encoding step in PHP it resulted in a much shorter encrypted string ... I'm not sure what to think of that :)

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Accepted this answer because it gave me a new approach. See my answer to my own question to see how I solved this in the end. –  Martin Hohenberg Jun 27 '12 at 11:26

Do you have SECURITY-POLICY:PBE-HASH-ALGORITHM and SECURITY-POLICY:PBE-KEY-ROUNDS defined anywhere?:

http://documentation.progress.com/output/OpenEdge102b/pdfs/dvpin/dvpin.pdf#page=173

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OK, so I finally gave up. The problem obviously was the hash function in OpenEdge which I failed to reproduce in PHP. The solution was to get the hashed key from the hash function and move it in HEX to the PHP over a second channel, to use it there to decrypt.

It's not perfectly secure, it's not elegant, but it works, and our security problems are not code-side, but database storage side. Your requirements might be different, so use this approach only if you are certain it will be useable.

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