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I am new to Amazon Cloud, and trying to create an EC2 instance that can allow multiple users to access at the same time.

While there are plenty of documentations, I haven't found an answer to my question. Whenever those documentations say "user", it refers me. But I want to have an application installed in the instance, and allow more than one of my users to access it simultaneously.

How can I achieve this? Thank you very much!

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closed as off topic by Robert Harvey Jun 20 '12 at 21:09

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Are you wanting your users to use ssh to connect to the instance? If so, do you want them to log in as the same system user, or as different users? Or do you just want the users to access some web application? What us the application you are installing? –  Eric Hammond Jun 20 '12 at 17:21
    
I am installing a database in the instance. I'm not sure how many ways my user can connect to this instance. But preferably, they can log in as different users. –  user1469452 Jun 20 '12 at 20:55

1 Answer 1

The same way you would add multiple users to a normal instance. I am going to assume you are using linux and can login to the instance, if not, see this post. Now you just need to add a user, and setup the ssh keys.

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Thank you for replying, but I am using Windows. I already have an EC2 instance and this is the first instance I ever created. So I am not sure how a normal instance would add multiple users. –  user1469452 Jun 20 '12 at 18:33

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