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I have an WCF RESTFull Service which i need to deploy on IIS6. I have never done this before and i am completely new to the IIS environment. I found a good solution here on the forums but its not precise enough for my case. maybe someone can give me based on this solution a more expanded version:

Option 1 - "bin" deploy (preferred option)

  1. compile your WCF service into a DLL (class library)
    1. create a website in IIS6
    2. copy the WCF DLL's into the website's .\bin folder
    3. create a *.svc file in that website
    4. add an appropriate web.config in the website folder to define your endpoints and service configuration etc.

Your WCF service will now be reachable at the website's base address, plus the name of the *.svc file, e.g.

h ttp://myserver/someweb/Myservice.svc

Your *.svc would look something like this:

The Service= attributes denotes the class implementing the service - fully qualified with its namespace.

What is the .\bin folder in point 3. ? Where can i find it?

I need the exact settings for the property page tabs of the website please. Also the address: h ttp://myserver/someweb/Myservice.svc ... What is the someweb ? the physical direcotory of the website? or the base address from the webconfig file?

An exact step for step guide with all needed settings would be great.

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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For the '/bin', manually create it in the root of the website you create and copy the assemblies into it.

Create the .svc in the root of the website and access it using a similiar url to;

http://yourwebsitename/service.svc
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does it have to be a virtual directory? i am getting 404 error by browsing myserver/websitedirectory/service.svc –  DI MI Jun 20 '12 at 14:41
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