Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I need to do the following:

Select Usernames from table delivery where date>"2012-06-01 00:00:00" then get IP from Customers order by IP and remove duplicated usernames (all based on the first usernames select).

select Username from delivery where date>"2012-06-01 00:00:00"
                        INNER JOIN Customers d
                        ON c.Username = d.Username order by IP asc;

It isn't working, any idea?

EDIT:

select Username from delivery c
    INNER JOIN Customers d
    ON c.Username = d.Username 
where date>"2012-06-01 00:00:00"
order by IP asc;
share|improve this question
    
"It isn't working" Can you be more specific? Do you get an error message? What is the exact message? – Mark Byers Jun 20 '12 at 15:09
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this:

SELECT DISTINCT d.Username, c.IP 
FROM delivery d INNER JOIN Customers c
    ON d.Username = c.Username 
   AND DATE(d.date) >= "2012-06-01"
ORDER BY c.IP
share|improve this answer
    
@Darkeden: did you try my query? – Marco Jun 20 '12 at 15:17
    
[Err] 1064 - You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'GROUP BY d.Username' at line 6 – Darkeden Jun 20 '12 at 15:19
    
The Error 1064 stills - You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'GROUP BY d.Username' at line 6 – Darkeden Jun 20 '12 at 15:27
    
@Darkeden: if you remove that part what happens? The query is executed? – Marco Jun 20 '12 at 15:28
    
yes, but with duplicated users. – Darkeden Jun 20 '12 at 15:31

You are missing the alias on the first table:

select Username from delivery c 
INNER JOIN Customers d ON c.Username = d.Username
where c.date='2012-06-01 00:00:00'
order by IP asc;
share|improve this answer

1) The WHERE clause must come after the JOIN ... ON ... clause.

2) You reference a table c:

ON c.Username = d.Username 

but you haven't defined what c is.

3) You want to remove duplicated usernames, but you didn't do that. You need to SELECT DISTINCT Username or GROUP BY Username.

4) To solve the problem of ambiguous column names you can use one of two approaches:

  • Specify the table alias before the column name (separated by a dot).
  • Use USING as the join condition, to avoid getting the Username column twice.

Here's an example of the second approach:

...
FROM delivery AS d
INNER JOIN Customers AS c USING (Username)
...

As you can see, it is much more concise and it means that you can reference Username elsewhere in the query without having to specify the table alias to disambiguate.


A completely different way to solve the problem is to use EXISTS instead of a JOIN:

SELECT DISTINCT
    Username, IP 
FROM customers
WHERE EXISTS
(
    SELECT *
    FROM delivery
    WHERE delivery.Username = customers.Username 
    AND delivery.date >= '2012-06-01'
)
ORDER BY IP

You may also be able to remove the DISTINCT when using this approach, assuming that there are no duplicates in your customers table.

share|improve this answer
    
Solved, thanks. – Darkeden Jun 20 '12 at 15:13
    
Select Username.... c.Username = d.Username; - returns error [Err] 1052 - Column 'Username' in field list is ambiguous – Darkeden Jun 20 '12 at 15:16
    
it stills not working. "select distinct Username from delivery as c INNER JOIN Customers as d USING (Username) on c.Username = d.Username where indate>"2012-06-01" order by IP asc;" – Darkeden Jun 20 '12 at 15:33
    
[Err] 1064 - You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'on c.Username = d.Username where indate>"2012-06-01" order by IP asc;' at line 3 – Darkeden Jun 20 '12 at 15:34
    
@Darkeden: The USING clause is instead of the ON clause. You shouldn't use both. – Mark Byers Jun 20 '12 at 15:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.