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I'm using OpenMP to make parallel version of Dijkstra algorithm. My code consists of two parts. First part is execute only by one thread (master). This thread chooses new nodes from list. Second part is execute by other threads. These threads change distances from source to other nodes. Unfortunatelly in my code is error because one of many threads which execute second part suddenly "disappear". Probably there is problem with data synchronization, but I don't know where. I would be grateful if someone could tell me where is my mistake. Here is the code:

map<int, int> C;
map<int, int> S;
map<int, int> D;
int init;
int nu;
int u;
int p = 3;//omp_get_num_threads();
int d;
int n = graph->getNodesNum();

#pragma omp parallel shared(n, C, d, S, init, nu, u, D, graph, p) num_threads(p)
{
    int myId = omp_get_thread_num();
    if (myId == 0)
    {
        init = 0;
        nu = 0;

        u = to;
        while (init < p - 1)
        {
        }

        while (u != 0)
        {
            S[u] = 1;
            while (nu < p - 1)
            {
            }
            u = 0;
            d = INFINITY;
            for (int i = 1; i <= p - 1; ++i)
            {
                int j = C[i];
                if ((j != 0) && (D[j] < d))
                {
                    d = D[j];
                    u = j;
                }
            }
            nu = 0; 
        }
    }
    else
    {
        for (int i=myId; i<=n; i += p-1)
        {
            D[i] = INFINITY;
            S[i] = 0;
        }

        D[u] = 0;

        ++init; 
        while (init < p-1)
        {
        }
        while (u != 0)
        {
            C[myId] = 0;
            int d = INFINITY;

            for (int i = myId; i<=n; i+=p-1)
            {
                if (S[i] == 0)
                {
                    if (i != u)
                    {
                        int cost = graph->getCostBetween(u, i);
                        if (cost != INFINITY)
                        {
                            D[i] = min(D[i], D[u] + cost);
                        }
                    }
                    if ((d > D[i])) 
                    {                           
                        d = D[i];
                        C[myId] = i;
                    }
                }
            }
            ++nu;
            while (nu != 0)
            {
            }   
        }
    }       
}

}

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2  
this sounds like an abysmal way to parallelize an inherently sequential algorithm. Why are you doing that? the cost of passing the vertex to a thread should be approximately equal to that of updating the costs. –  akappa Jun 20 '12 at 15:36
    
I must prepare parallel version to show that Dijkstra can be faster when we use more cores. I know that Dijkstra is hard to parallelize and usually speedup is lower than 1. However I found some information that there is the way to implement this algorithm with speedup 1,2-1,4. My code present this way, so at this moment I want to detect mistake. –  mchrobok Jun 20 '12 at 19:27
1  
The "speed-up" of an implementation depends on the number of parallel processors used, so I don't understand what does those figures means. Probably, the speed-up depends on the "denseness" of your graph and in how much time you spend passing vertexes around. It is a very fine-grained approach, so you need a wonderfully tuned implementation to achieve a version that is sensibly faster (if faster at all) w.r.t. the sequential implementation. As for your implementation, I don't understand where your main thread dispatches vertexes to be relaxed to other threads. –  akappa Jun 20 '12 at 21:26

1 Answer 1

I don't know what information you have, but parallelising an irregular, highly synchronized algorithm with small tasks is amongst the toughest parallel problems one can have. Research teams can dedicate themselves to such tasks and get limited speedups, or nowhere with it. Often such algorithms only work on specific architectures that are tailored for the parallelisation, and quirky overheads such as false sharing have been eliminated by designing the data structures appropriately.

An algorithm such as this needs a lot of time and effort to profile, measure, and consideration. See for example this paper.

ww2.cs.fsu.edu/~flin/ppq_report.pdf

Now, onto your direct question, since your algorithm is highly synchronized and tasks are small you are experiencing the side effect of data races. To remove these from your parallel algorithm is going to be very tricky, and no-one here can do it for you.

So your first point of call is to look at tools which can help you detect data races such as Valgrind and the Intel thread checker.

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