Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to add shaders with GLFW/GLEW.

I am getting an error that the shaders are loaded but they don't have valid object code.

This is the code I have for loading the shaders:

class SHADER {
public:

void LoadShaders(const char *vertexFile, const char *fragmentFile);

char *vertexShader;
char *fragmentShader;

private:

int Load(const char *filename, char*&shaderSource);
fstream file;
};

int SHADER::Load(const char *filename, char *&shaderSource) {
file.open(filename, ios::in);
if(file.is_open()) {
    file.tellg();
    file.seekg(0,ios::end);
    unsigned long len = file.tellg();
    file.seekg(ios::beg);

    if(len == 0 ) {
        return -2;
    } else {
        shaderSource = new char[len + 1];
        file.read(shaderSource,len);
        file.close();
        printf("%s\n",shaderSource);
    }
} else {
    return -1;
}
return 0;
}

void SHADER::LoadShaders(const char *vertexFile, const char *fragmentFile) {
int resultVertex = this->Load(vertexFile, vertexShader);
int resultFragment = this->Load(fragmentFile, fragmentShader);
if(resultVertex ==0 && resultFragment ==0) {
    printf("Shaders loaded succesfully.\n");
}
if(resultVertex == -2) {
    printf("VertexShader is empty!\n");
}
if(resultFragment == -2) {
    printf("FragmentShader is empty!\n");
}
if(resultVertex == -1) {
    printf("Unable to load VertexShader!\n");
}
if(resultFragment == -1) {
    printf("Unable to load FragmentShader!\n");
}
}

This is the code for initializing the shaders:

SHADER Shaders;
GLhandleARB vertexShader, fragmentShader, shaderProgram;

Shaders.LoadShaders("vertexShader.vert","fragmentShader.frag");

const char* vertTemp = Shaders.vertexShader;
vertexShader = glCreateShaderObjectARB(GL_VERTEX_SHADER_ARB);
glShaderSourceARB(vertexShader, 1, &vertTemp, NULL);
glCompileShaderARB(vertexShader);
traceShaderInfoLog(vertexShader);

const char* fragTemp = Shaders.fragmentShader;
fragmentShader = glCreateShaderObjectARB(GL_FRAGMENT_SHADER_ARB);
glShaderSourceARB(fragmentShader, 1, &fragTemp, NULL);
glCompileShaderARB(fragmentShader);
traceShaderInfoLog(fragmentShader);

delete[] Shaders.vertexShader;
delete[] Shaders.fragmentShader;

shaderProgram = glCreateProgramObjectARB();
glAttachObjectARB(shaderProgram,vertexShader);
glAttachObjectARB(shaderProgram,fragmentShader);
glLinkProgramARB(shaderProgram);
traceProgramInfoLog(shaderProgram);

glUseProgramObjectARB(shaderProgram);

This is vertexShader.vert and fragmentShader.frag:

void main(){
gl_Position = ftransform();
}
void main(){
gl_FragColor = vec4(1.0, 0.0, 0.0, 1.0);
}

And this is the error I get when I print the log, I get this really weird symbol at the end of the scripts which is every time I compile again another symbol:

void main(){
    //gl_Position = gl_ModelViewProjectionMatrix * gl_Vertex;
    gl_Position = ftransform();
}┘
void main(){
    gl_FragColor = vec4(1.0, 0.0, 0.0, 1.0);
}♣
Shaders loaded succesfully.
Vertex shader was successfully compiled to run on hardware.

Fragment shader failed to compile with the following errors:
ERROR: 0:3: error(#132) Syntax error: '<' parse error
ERROR: error(#273) 1 compilation errors.  No code generated

Fragment shader(s) were not successfully compiled before glLinkProgram() was called.
Link failed.
share|improve this question
    
The weird character comes from failure to append a NUL (you left room for it, but never wrote to the last character). In Shader::LOAD, set shaderSource[len] = 0;. –  Ben Voigt Jun 20 '12 at 15:27
    
I still get the weird character when I set shaderSource[len] = 0; –  motash Jun 20 '12 at 15:32
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your Load function is most likely the problem: the signature should read

int SHADER::Load(const char *filename, char *&shaderSource) // Note the &

for a quick fix. You're allocating the memory in that function and reassigning to the pointer - you only load the source to that address - but that never leaves the function.

The compiler most likely gets an empty string due to memory being zero initialized (are you running this in debug?) and doesn't fail because that's sometimes okay. But the linker notices that there's not really any code to link!

share|improve this answer
    
Also, you should not free() memory that you new[]ed - you should delete[] it. And the destructor of your SHADER class would be where to do it - also, zero-initialize those pointers in the constructor. Or better yet: use std::string or any decent string class. –  ltjax Jun 20 '12 at 15:56
    
Thanks but now I got this error:Shaders loaded succesfully. Vertex shader was successfully compiled to run on hardware. Fragment shader failed to compile with the following errors: ERROR: 0:3: error(#132) Syntax error: '<' parse error ERROR: error(#273) 1 compilation errors. No code generated Fragment shader(s) were not successfully compiled before glLinkProgram() was called. Link failed. –  motash Jun 20 '12 at 15:57
2  
Did you add the zero-termination character as Ben Voigt suggested? Do you still have those weird characters when printing your source? You should probably add the std::ios::binary flag to open() when reading a file like this, so tellg works as you would expect. –  ltjax Jun 20 '12 at 16:05
    
The std::ios::binary was the problem, thank you very much! –  motash Jun 20 '12 at 16:08
add comment

When it fails to link, retrieve the link error log, which may have additional clues.

See glGetProgramInfoLog.

share|improve this answer
    
I used glGetProgramInfoLog, and that resulted in ERROR: error(#280) Not all shaders have valid object code ERROR: error(#280) Not all shaders have valid object code –  motash Jun 20 '12 at 15:28
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.