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I have a C# Visual Studio project in a git repository. I want to ignore the contents bin/Debug directory but not the contents of the bin/Release' directory. I've added bin/Debug to my .gitignore file, but it doesn't seem to work - it is including the entire contents of the bin directory. What would the correct entry be to do this?

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show us your .gitignore file please –  uDaY Jun 20 '12 at 15:50
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add 'Debug/' to your .gitignore –  Noah Jun 20 '12 at 15:53
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4 Answers

Here's what we've been using lately, it removes all resharper generated stuff and some other important things. Note that we don't commit our release directory, so you shouldn't include Release/ in your .gitingore, but to answer your question, you should include Debug/.

/build/
*.suo
*.user
_ReSharper.*/
*.sdf
bin/
obj/
Debug/
Release/
*.opensdf
*.tlog
*.log
TestResult.xml
*.VisualState.xml
Version.cs
Version.h
Version.cpp

UPDATE

Here's a pretty comprehensive example from github: https://github.com/github/gitignore and https://github.com/github/gitignore/blob/master/VisualStudio.gitignore

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This probably won't work due to the bin/ ignore directive making Debug/ and Release/ redundant. –  Gary.S Jun 20 '12 at 16:13
    
You should try it first... –  Noah Jun 20 '12 at 16:55
    
@Gary.S, it should still work. The latter lines are just redundant and could be removed. –  Drew Noakes Jul 9 '12 at 19:30
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This typically happens because the .gitignore was added after the files were committed. The .gitignore tells git to ignore untracked files that match, once stuff is committed the ignore will no longer work. One way to fix it is to remove the bin/debug folder (manually through explorer/powershell/bash), then commit the removals. Once that is done the ignores should work as you expect.

  1. Remove files/folder
  2. git add -A
  3. git commit
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I fixed this by replacing bin/Debug with Debug.

This would also have the affect of ignoring the obj/Debug directory, however I want to ignore the entire contents of the obj directory, so I have also added obj to .gitignore.

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You shouldn't have to delete anything. After you added the .gitignore file, run this command to clear the cache, then stage and commit again:

git rm -r . --cached
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