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I have a model class similar to the following:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations;
using System.Linq;
using System.Web;
using System.Web.Mvc;

[System.Runtime.Serialization.DataContract(IsReference = true)]
[System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations.ScaffoldTable(true)]
public class TestModel
{
    [Display(Name="Schedule Name")]
    [Required]
    public string scheduleName;
}

And in my .cshtml file I have:

        <li>
            @Html.LabelFor(m => m.scheduleName)
            @Html.TextBoxFor(m => m.scheduleName, Model.scheduleName)
            @Html.ValidationMessageFor(m => m.scheduleName)
        </li>

But for some reason my display name is not showing up (the label shows 'scheduleName')

I swear I have the same code in other classes and it seems to display just fine. Can anyone point out a reason why this would not work?

share|improve this question
    
build your project and try again – Shyju Jun 20 '12 at 16:05
    
@Shyju thanks, but i've rebuild the project many times (I've been having the issue for many days now and just decided to reach out for help). – Kyle Jun 20 '12 at 16:10
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The DataAnnotationsModelMetadataProvider works on properties. Your scheduleName should be a property not "just" a field.

[System.Runtime.Serialization.DataContract(IsReference = true)]
[System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations.ScaffoldTable(true)]
public class TestModel
{
    [Display(Name="Schedule Name")]
    [Required]
    public string scheduleName { get; set; }
}

Note: According to the C# naming conventions your property names should be PascalCased.

share|improve this answer
    
You mean Pascal-cased; it's already camel cased. – HackedByChinese Jun 20 '12 at 16:12
1  
Ah, that did it. I did not realize that it needed to be a property and not a field. – Kyle Jun 20 '12 at 16:12
    
@HackedByChinese good catch, fixed :) – nemesv Jun 20 '12 at 16:13

This is an example of the solution, however still there is no luck to display the name defined using EF v4:

public class Login { [Display(Name = "Role")] public int type { get; set; } }

share|improve this answer
    
Note: I am unable to add this as comment, pardon me. – user1782661 Nov 22 '12 at 4:10

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