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I've been writing some jQuery functions that have JavaScript variables and looping, etc inside them - they're becoming long and hard to read. If I want to break them up, how would I do that?

    $(".x").click(function ()
    {
      var i=0;
      for (i=0;i<50;i++)
      {
        if ($("#x"+i).is(':hidden'))
        {
          $("#x"+i).show();
        }
        else
        {
          $("#x"+i).hide();
        }
      }
    });

For example, in the code above, if I want to move the contents of the loop to a separate function and then call that function from inside the loop, what would that need to look like?

share|improve this question
    
Following the post you've selected as the answer is totally reinventing the wheel. You can use the toggle() function for all that he has coded and you do not need to use the :hidden item at all since toggle reverses the current setting. –  RSolberg Jul 13 '09 at 16:10
    
@RSolberg: Perhaps the choice was made because I was the only one who answered the actual question... –  Guffa Jul 13 '09 at 20:34
    
@Guffa - Definitely not... All of the answers posted before yours also contained the answer. Yours happens to be the least of what I would say is inline with best practices. –  RSolberg Jul 13 '09 at 22:29
1  
@RSolberg: Read the question again. It clearly ask how it would look to put the contents of the loop in a function. My answer is the only one that shows that. You are right that it might be better practice to put the loop in the function also, but that is still not the answer to the actual question. –  Guffa Jul 14 '09 at 8:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is no such thing as "JQuery functions", the JQuery code just usually uses an anonymous Javascript function.

To move the contents of the loop into a named function would look like this:

$(".x").click( function() {
  for (var i=0; i<50; i++) toggleItem(i)
});

function toggleItem(i) {
  if ($("#x"+i).is(':hidden')) {
    $("#x"+i).show();
  } else {
    $("#x"+i).hide();
  }
}

However, you could use the cascading properties of CSS to toggle all the items with a simple javascript statement instead of looping through all the elements. Example:

CSS:

<style type="text/css">
.StateOne .InitiallyHidden { display: none; }
.StateTwo .InitiallyVisible { display: none; }
</style>

HTML:

<div class="StateOne" id="StateContainer">
   <div class="InitiallyVisible">Visible first</div>
   <div class="InitiallyHidden">Visible second</div>
   <div class="InitiallyVisible">Visible first</div>
   <div class="InitiallyHidden">Visible second</div>
   <div class="InitiallyVisible">Visible first</div>
   <div class="InitiallyHidden">Visible second</div>
   <div class="InitiallyVisible">Visible first</div>
   <div class="InitiallyHidden">Visible second</div>
</div>

Javascript:

$('.x').click(function() {
   var s = document.getElementById('StateContainer');
   s.className = (s.className == 'StateOne' ? 'StateTwo' : 'StateOne');
});
share|improve this answer
    
This is great. I really like your alternate approach and I almost understand it too. One question: Did you make a mistake when you defined the styles for StateOne and StateTwo - they are both set to "display:none" - shouldn't StateTwo be visible? –  Charlie Kotter Jul 11 '09 at 0:40
    
@Charlie: No, it's not a mistake in the styles. The InitiallyHidden class is hidden when the parent element has the class StateOne and visible for StateTwo. The InitiallyVisible class is the opposite. That way you can have one set of elemenets visible for each state. –  Guffa Jul 11 '09 at 0:58
    
I'm trying this out on my machine but I can't activate the change of state. I put your Javascript inside document ready and then I defined a button: <button class="x">Change StateContainer</button>. But this doesn't change the state. Did I forget to do something? I will edit my question to show you the complete code. –  Charlie Kotter Jul 11 '09 at 1:06
    
I added the complete HTML above in my question. If you could take a look and maybe point out what I forgot, I would appreciate it. Thanks. –  Charlie Kotter Jul 11 '09 at 1:09
    
@Charlie: You forgot to include the JQuery library. You need it as you are still using the $ function. You could of course do it without JQuery, then you would put the Javascript code in the button tag instead. –  Guffa Jul 11 '09 at 1:14

jQuery is javascript, so you can pass functions around just like you would normally do.

// first refactor - separate the function out
$(".x").click(myfunc);

function myfunc() {
{
  var i=0;
  for (i=0;i<50;i++)
  {
    if ($("#x"+i).is(':hidden'))
    {
      $("#x"+i).show();
    }
    else
    {
      $("#x"+i).hide();
    }
  }
}

Although looking at your code it is screaming for all x1 to x50 elements to have the same class applied to it. like so...

<div id='x1' class='xClass'></div>
<div id='x2' class='xClass'></div>
<div id='x3' class='xClass'></div>
.....
<div id='x50' class='xClass'></div>

Then you could do something like

var currentHidden = $('.xClass:hidden')
var currentVisible = $('.xClass:visible')
currentHidden.show();
currentVisible.show();

and yes toggle is even better

$('.xClass').toggle();

then you don't have to loop, which is one of the beauties of using jQuery! =)

share|improve this answer
    
too bad your answer is inferior to mine. –  Jon Erickson Jul 10 '09 at 23:23
1  
i like how this answer was voted down so much... so haters –  Jon Erickson Jul 13 '09 at 15:55
    
Mine was as well... The last answer in was the one that was selected as the answer as well. The guy literally sniped the other posted answers and won with something that seems to reinvent the wheel. Why he doesn't just use the "toggle" function is mind blowing... –  RSolberg Jul 13 '09 at 16:09
    
@RSolberg: I didn't copy anything at all from any other post. If I would have, I wouldn't have answered the actual question, as noone else did that. –  Guffa Jul 13 '09 at 20:59

The difference between a jQuery function and a JavaScript function is non-existent since jQuery really is javascript.

$(".x").click(DoTheThingYouDo);

function DoTheThingYouDo()
{
  var i=0;
  for (i=0;i<50;i++)
  {
      $("#x"+i).toggle();
  }
}

You can use the toggle() call to show and hide... You could also in theory use a CSS class and just toggle all of the DOM elements that have that class...

$(".x").click(DoTheThingYouDo);

function DoTheThingYouDo()
{
   $(".myclass").toggle();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
It would be $(".x").click(DoTheThingYouDo); (no parentheses after the function name). –  Sasha Chedygov Jul 10 '09 at 23:37
1  
I believe the syntax is incorrect. You want: $(".x").click(DoTheThingYouDo). Note: no parentheses. Otherwise you're calling that function and passing the result to the click() handler. –  cletus Jul 10 '09 at 23:37
    
Thanks @musicfreak and @cletus. Post has been corrected. –  RSolberg Jul 10 '09 at 23:39

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