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First of all, if the title of my question is not clear, please go ahead and edit it!

So suppose I have a square matrix.

ex = outer(1:4, 2:5, "+")
colnames(ex) = paste(rep(c("Subj1", "Subj2"), each=2), "_", 
               rep("Factor1", each=2), ".", rep(c("A", "B")), sep="")
rownames(ex) = paste(rep(c("Subj1", "Subj2"), each=2), "_", 
               rep("Factor2", each=2), ".", rep(c("A", "B")), sep="")

The matrix: enter image description here

I would like to extract the values in the red boxes, which basically are values for the different combinations of factor levels within each subject (but not across different subjects), and save them into a vector in the sequence below:

[1] 3, 4, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9

I can of course use a loop like the one below:

v = NULL
for(i in 1:16){if(ex2[i,2] == ex2[i,3]) v[i] = ex2[i,1]}
v = v[!is.na(v)]
v
[1] 3 4 4 5 7 8 8 9

I wonder if there is a more elegant way to do this that can take into account the number of subjects, the number of factors, as well as the number of levels within each factor (assuming that all factors have an equal number of levels.)

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

To extract the submatrices in the red boxes, you can simply do:

ex[1:2, 1:2]

and

ex[3:4, 3:4]

To turn them into a single vector like you want, just do:

c(ex[1:2, 1:2], ex[3:4, 3:4])
# [1] 3 4 4 5 7 8 8 9

ETA: To answer your question in more general terms: let's say we had the number of subjects and levels set up in advance (increasing the number of factors is more complicated, unless I'm mistaken, because then it would no longer be a two-dimensional matrix).

num.subjects = 2
num.levels = 2
size = num.subjects * num.levels
ex = outer(1:size, (1:size)+1, "+")

We can get the solution like this:

subjects = rep(1:num.subjects, each=num.levels)
v = c(sapply(1:num.subjects, function(s) ex[subjects == s, subjects == s]))

v is now

 [1] 3 4 4 5 7 8 8 9

This can be extended to much larger numbers of subjects and levels. Setting subjects to 3 and levels to 4 gets:

 [1]  3  4  5  6  4  5  6  7  5  6  7  8  6  7  8  9 11 12 13 14 12 13 14 15 13
[26] 14 15 16 14 15 16 17 19 20 21 22 20 21 22 23 21 22 23 24 22 23 24 25

To give a bit more explanation: creating a list of each of the per-individual submatrices can be done pretty simply:

matrices = lapply(1:num.subjects, function(s) ex[subjects == s, subjects == s])

matrices is now:

[[1]]
     [,1] [,2]
[1,]    3    4
[2,]    4    5

[[2]]
     [,1] [,2]
[1,]    7    8
[2,]    8    9

For the vector version, you'll have to concatenate each individually and then overall. This is effectively what the above solution does.

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Thank you so much! This does exactly what I want to accomplish! –  Alex Jun 20 '12 at 22:42

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