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I have an android app that plays audio from the application class. I have a PhoneStateListener in my application class that pauses the audio when there is a phone call.

I want to start a particular activity when the call ends, but I am unable to. here is my code:

public void getPhoneState(){

TelephonyManager mgr = (TelephonyManager) getSystemService(TELEPHONY_SERVICE);
PhoneStateListener phoneStateListener = new PhoneStateListener() {
    @Override
    public void onCallStateChanged(int state, String incomingNumber) {

        if (state == TelephonyManager.CALL_STATE_RINGING) {
            if(audio.isPlaying())
               audioPlayer.pause();

        } 
            else if(state == TelephonyManager.CALL_STATE_IDLE) {

                audio.start();
                Intent missintent= new Intent(context,AudioActivity.class);
                missintent.addFlags(Intent.FLAG_ACTIVITY_NEW_TASK);
                startActivity(missintent);


        } 
            else if(state == TelephonyManager.CALL_STATE_OFFHOOK) {

            if(audio.isPlaying())
            audioPlayer.pause();

        }
        super.onCallStateChanged(state, incomingNumber);


    }
};

if(mgr != null) {
    mgr.listen(phoneStateListener, PhoneStateListener.LISTEN_CALL_STATE);
}
}

public boolean handleAudio(String source, int id) {

phoneState();
//Code for Playing Audio
.....
.....
}

I would appreciate it if someone could show me how to start the activity in the correct manner.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
I'm not sure about the correct approach on this matter, as I never did it, and don't know if you're supposed to start an activity from the application class, because you always set the entry class on the manifest, but considering you can do it... did you add your activity to the manifest? –  Nuno Gonçalves Jun 20 '12 at 16:38
    
My activity has been added to the manifest. Is it not possible to launch an activity from the application class ? –  Raghav Shankar Jun 20 '12 at 16:41
    
I didn't say it isn't. I said I don't know, cuz I never did it and since you already have the start class on the manifest, defined by the intent: <intent-filter><action android:name="android.intent.action.MAIN"/><category android:name="android.intent.category.LAUNCHER"/></intent-filter> –  Nuno Gonçalves Jun 20 '12 at 16:43
    
@RaghavShankar I am having a very similar issue, did you find any kind of solution? –  MikeIsrael Jun 26 '12 at 14:44
    
"but I am unable to." : you need to tell us what is going on. Describe + logs –  Philippe Girolami Jun 26 '12 at 15:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Ok so I know you found another solution already, but I was cracking around at it and found something that worked for me. Instead of calling an intent I used pendingIntent, an intent filter, and pending post. Here is a code snippit for anyone else out there having this issue.

Context context = MyApplication.this.getApplicationContext();
Intent errorActivity = new Intent("com.error.activity");//this has to match your intent filter
errorActivity.setFlags(Intent.FLAG_ACTIVITY_NEW_TASK);
PendingIntent pendingIntent = PendingIntent.getActivity(context, 22, errorActivity, 0);
try {
    pendingIntent.send();
    } 
catch (CanceledException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
    }

Then in your manifest just make sure you set the intent filter for the catching activity

<activity
    android:name="UncaughtErrorDialogActivity"
    android:theme="@android:style/Theme.Dialog" >
    <intent-filter>
        <action android:name="com.error.activity" />
        <category android:name="android.intent.category.DEFAULT" />
    </intent-filter>
</activity>
share|improve this answer

You can inject a reference to a Context on your creation of your listener:

public class Whatever extends Activity {

private PhoneStateListener phoneStateListener;
....
    phoneStateListener = new PhoneStateListener() {
        private Whatever mContext = Whatever.this;
....

You would be able to use this functionality only while the Context you're feeding in is relevant ie, if it is destroyed (or is in some other state which would stop you from using it). When your context is no longer is a usable state you would have to remove the Listener otherwise it would start throwing IllegalStateExceptions.

public void onDestroy() {
    super.onDestroy();
    // code required to remove phoneStateListener here.
}

You could add not only your Activity context but instead your Application context in order to increase the usefulness of your listener.

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