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#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<malloc.h>

#include <math.h>
typedef struct label{

int id;
double p,*t,q,c;

int V[45];
struct label *next;
struct label *prev;
struct path *tail;
struct path *head;

  }label;

 typedef struct path{
int i;

struct path *Pperv;
struct path *Pnext;
}path;




void main (){

int i,j,k;
struct label *Current,*FCurrent,*Current2,*Head,*Tail,*FHead,*FTail;
struct path *cur,*test3,*test2,*test1,*path_head,*path_tail;

Head=(struct label*)malloc(1*sizeof(struct label));
Tail=(struct label*)malloc(1*sizeof(struct label));



Head->next=Tail;
Tail->prev=Head;

FHead=(struct label*)malloc(1*sizeof(struct label));
FTail=(struct label*)malloc(1*sizeof(struct label));

FHead->next=FTail;
FTail->prev=FHead;



for (i=0;i<250000;i++)
{
    //printf("%d",i);
    Current=(struct label*)malloc(1*sizeof(struct label));
    Current->t=(double*)malloc(15*sizeof(double));

    Current->head=(struct path*)malloc(1*sizeof(struct path));
    Current->tail=(struct path*)malloc(1*sizeof(struct path));
    Current->head->Pnext=Current->tail;
    Current->tail->Pperv=Current->head;

    for (j=0;j<15;j++)
    {
        test1=(struct path*)malloc(1*sizeof(struct path));

        test1->Pperv=Current->head;
        test1->Pnext=Current->head->Pnext;

        Current->head->Pnext->Pperv=test1;
        Current->head->Pnext=test1;


        test1->i=1;
        Current->t[j]=23123.43;

    }
    if (i % 4!=0)
    {
    Current->next=Tail;
    Current->prev=Tail->prev;
    Tail->prev->next=Current;
    Tail->prev=Current;
    Current->p=54545.323241321;
    }
    else 
    {   


    Current->next=FTail;
    Current->prev=FTail->prev;
    FTail->prev->next=Current;
    FTail->prev=Current;


    }
}



Current=Head->next;
while(Current->next!=Tail)
{   

    Head->next->next->prev=Head;
    Head->next=Head->next->next;

    test1=Current->head->Pnext;
    while(test1!=Current->tail)
        {
            test2=test1;
            test1=test1->Pnext;
            free(test2);


        }

    free(Current->t);
    free(Current->head);
    free(Current->tail);
    free(Current);
    Current=Head->next;
}


Current=FHead->next;
while(Current->next!=FTail)
{   

    FHead->next->next->prev=FHead;
    FHead->next=FHead->next->next;
    k=0;
    test1=Current->head->Pnext;
    while(test1!=Current->tail)
        {

            test2=test1;
            test1=test1->Pnext;
            free(test2);
            k++;


        }

    free(Current->t);
    free(Current->head);
    free(Current->tail);
    free(Current);
    Current=FHead->next;
}







}

I expirience the following problem. This is not my actuall problem its just an example i created in order for the problem to be more easy to be viewed. As you can see in this example I have two structs the one inside the other and what the example does is to creates new structs of type label and to put them 3 out of 4 times in the list with pointers FHead and FTail and 1 out of 4 time in the list with the pointers Head and Tail. The problem is that when i try to free the structs it is not happening, the syntax is 100% right as when i save all the structs in just one of the two lists the fee function works just fine. That leads me to the result that something is happening wrong with my use of the pointers, unfortunately i am new in C so I don't know very well how the whole pointer thing goes. So I would be very thankfull if somebody could explain what is going wrong with the use of the pointers and how should I xreate tese lists in ordr for the frre functions to work corrctly. Thank you in advance...

share|improve this question
2  
Your question is really un-stackoverflowish. Try to post simple, concise, as much straightforward as possible code, properly commented. Also, ask equally objective questions and post only relevant information. –  André Santos de Medeiros Jun 20 '12 at 17:06
    
What do you mean "when I try to free the structs it is not happening"? What do you expect to happen, how are you observing that free isn't happening? –  TJD Jun 20 '12 at 17:14
    
not sure why you bother to do typedefs but then do not use them? –  CyberSpock Jun 20 '12 at 17:15

1 Answer 1

Your code is rather hard to read as you have only a very long function and many things happen in it. It is hard to read even for an experienced C, so it must be very hard for a C beginner. If you split this function into smaller, very specialized functions, it may be easier to understand and spot mistakes.

On a side note (even if the mistake probably does not come from here, not doing that is a very bad practice) : every time you call malloc, you have to check whether it failed or not. Malloc can fail to give you some memory, in which case it returns NULL. For example :

test1=(struct path*)malloc(1*sizeof(struct path));

might become

test1 = (struct path*)malloc(1*sizeof(struct path));
if (test1 == NULL) {
    abort(); /* Makes the program stop abruptly */
}

If you don't check and get a NULL result, your program will have a erratic behavior ; these bugs are very hard to find.

EDIT : as suggested by the comments, an even better style would be to do

test1 = malloc(sizeof(path));
if (test1 == NULL) {
    abort();   /* Or something else that makes sense */
}
share|improve this answer
    
BTW, won't casting malloc to a pointer produce any troublesome effects? –  André Santos de Medeiros Jun 20 '12 at 18:05
    
@AndréSantosdeMedeiros What sort of "troublesome effects" do you expect with the extraordinarily common (but unnecessary in C) casting of the void* pointer returned by malloc to a pointer some other type? –  Jim Balter Jun 20 '12 at 18:23
    
I really don't know. I don't programme C++ and hardly cast malloc void pointers! –  André Santos de Medeiros Jun 20 '12 at 18:29
1  
The main good reason to cast the result of malloc is to have C++ compatibility, where it is mandatory ; otherwise, it is pretty useless, but I can't see how it could make something bad happen. –  Fabien Jun 20 '12 at 18:46
1  
Casting the return value of malloc might mask a problem of not including the necessary headers for malloc (pre-C99 and implicit int). This could cause problems especially on platforms where sizeof(int) != sizeof(void*) or sizeof(size_t). –  eq- Jun 20 '12 at 20:11

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