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I am trying to implement a high performance thread-safe caching. Here is the code I have implemented. I don't want any on demand computing. Can I use cache.asMap() and retrieve the value safely? Even if the cache is set to have softValues?

  import java.io.IOException;
  import java.util.concurrent.ConcurrentMap;
  import java.util.concurrent.ExecutionException;
  import java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit;
  import java.util.concurrent.TimeoutException;

  import com.google.common.cache.Cache;
  import com.google.common.cache.CacheBuilder;

  public class MemoryCache {

    private static MemoryCache instance;
    private Cache<String, Object> cache;

    private MemoryCache(int concurrencyLevel, int expiration, int size) throws IOException {

        cache = CacheBuilder.newBuilder().concurrencyLevel(concurrencyLevel).maximumSize(size).softValues()
            .expireAfterWrite(expiration, TimeUnit.SECONDS).build();
    }

    static public synchronized MemoryCache getInstance() throws IOException {
        if (instance == null) {
               instance = new MemoryCache(10000, 3600,1000000);
        }
        return instance;
    }

    public Object get(String key) {
        ConcurrentMap<String,Object> map =cache.asMap();
        return map.get(key);
    }

    public void put(String key, Object obj) {
        cache.put(key, obj);
    }
   }
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4  
As a curiosity, do you really expect to have 10000 threads accessing your Cache concurrently? I ask since that's the value you're using as a concurrency level. –  pcalcao Jun 20 '12 at 17:44
    
No I've removed that parameter. I am now using the default concurrency level i.e. 4. Thanks for point it out though. –  user766453 Jun 21 '12 at 18:00

3 Answers 3

Guava contributor here:

Yes, that looks just fine, although I'm not sure what the point is of wrapping the cache in another object. (Also, Cache.getIfPresent(key) is fully equivalent to Cache.asMap().get(key).)

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If you want high performance, why don't you instanciate the Cache statically instead of using a synchronized getInstance()?

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Lazy loading, less locking

    static public MemoryCache getInstance() throws IOException {
            if (instance == null) {
               synchronized{
                  if (instance == null) {
                    instance = new MemoryCache(10000, 3600,1000000);
                  }
               }
            }
            return instance;
        }
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1  
Above example of lazy loading is an example of double-checked locking which does not work in Java. See cs.umd.edu/~pugh/java/memoryModel/DoubleCheckedLocking.html –  gogognome Apr 17 '14 at 14:45
4  
@gogognome DCL works perfectly since Java 1.5, assuming volatile instance. –  maaartinus Sep 14 '14 at 16:45

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