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I have two functions, but one of the functions is only called from the other, so I would like to inline the helper function. My code looks like this:

data PoS =  N | V | Adj | Adv | Phr

posEntity :: Parser PoS
posEntity = 
    do pos <- string "N." <|>
              string "V." <|>
              string "Adj." <|>
              string "Adv." <|>
              string "Phr."
       return (posToPoS pos)
    <?> "part of speech"

posToPoS pos
    | pos == "N." = N
    | pos == "V." = V
    | pos == "Adj." = Adj
    | pos == "Adv." = Adv
    | pos == "Phr." = Phr

Clearly the posToPoS should be inlined, but I am unsure of the syntax required to do such a thing.

Thanks!

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That's the compiler's job. It will decide whether it's a good idea to inline the function and if it decides against it, it's probably for the better :) –  Niklas B. Jun 20 '12 at 18:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

GHC probably will automatically inline it when optimizing. However, to force it to do so, simply add {-# INLINE posToPoS #-} somewhere in the code, preferably right next to the definition of posToPoS.

For making it local, so that only posEntity can see it, you want a where clause. Define it as such:

data PoS =  N | V | Adj | Adv | Phr

posEntity :: Parser PoS
posEntity = 
    do pos <- string "N." <|>
              string "V." <|>
              string "Adj." <|>
              string "Adv." <|>
              string "Phr."
       return (posToPoS pos)
    <?> "part of speech" where
        posToPoS pos
            | pos == "N." = N
            | pos == "V." = V
            | pos == "Adj." = Adj
            | pos == "Adv." = Adv
            | pos == "Phr." = Phr
share|improve this answer
    
I want it inlined for scoping reasons, not optimization. Thanks for your answer though, I did not know about that. –  Max Jun 20 '12 at 18:06
    
@Max: What do you mean, scoping reasons? You can explicitly define which functions are exported from a module and which are not. –  Niklas B. Jun 20 '12 at 18:07
    
I will need to do a different conversion depending on what I am parsing, and it would be annoying to have a bunch of different method names such as posToPoS1, posToPoS2, etc. All of these methods would be in the same module, so it would be nice to do the conversion exactly where I need the conversion done. You can see my answer below to understand what I meant. –  Max Jun 20 '12 at 18:11

You can either just inline the strings in the definition to posToPos:

posToPoS "N." = N
posToPoS "V." = V
-- ... etc

Or, you can use the following method in your parser directly:

import Control.Applicative hiding (<|>)

posEntity :: Parser PoS
posEntity = 
  (string "N."   *> pure N   <|>
   string "V."   *> pure V   <|>
   string "Adj." *> pure Adj <|>
   string "Adv." *> pure Adv <|>
   string "Phr." *> pure Phr)<?> "part of speech"

(You might need parens around the string "foo" *> pure Foo parts, I forget what the operator precedence is)

share|improve this answer

In your example, a simple case statement would seem a better solution:

posEntity = 
    do pos <- string "N." <|>
              string "V." <|>
              string "Adj." <|>
              string "Adv." <|>
              string "Phr."
       return $ case pos of
                  "N." -> N
                  "V." -> V
                  "Adj." -> Adj
                  "Adv." -> Adv
                  "Phr." -> Phr
    <?> "part of speech"

Pattern matching is generally preferrable over equality comparisons, if you have the choice.

share|improve this answer
    
Why the downvote? That's certainly a sensible way of "inlining" the function. –  leftaroundabout Jun 20 '12 at 18:12
    
I upvoted you back to 0. I like your solution better than mine, but can you explain the use of the dollar sign? Sorry, I am extremely new to Haskell. –  Max Jun 20 '12 at 18:14
    
That's just to seperate the return from the case block. –  leftaroundabout Jun 20 '12 at 18:15
    
Downvoted because the answer essentially is the same as @Max's, and the case statement adds noise to the function, while I think a where makes it clearer. Also, using applicative functors, there's no need to repeat the strings "N.", "V." etc. twice. –  dflemstr Jun 20 '12 at 18:19
    
@dflemstr you've got a point there, your Applicative solution is arguably better. But I disagree that it's the same as just putting the auxilliary function with its guards in a where block, in particular I think the pattern vs. guards distinction is important. –  leftaroundabout Jun 20 '12 at 18:21

Here is what I figured out. Sorry if I wasn't clear:

posEntity :: Parser PoS
posEntity = 
    do pos <- string "N." <|>
              string "V." <|>
              string "Adj." <|>
              string "Adv." <|>
              string "Phr."
       return (posToPoS pos)
    <?> "part of speech"
    where
      posToPoS pos
          | pos == "N." = N
          | pos == "V." = V
          | pos == "Adj." = Adj
          | pos == "Adv." = Adv
          | pos == "Phr." = Phr
share|improve this answer
    
Heh. It looks like you typed this up while I was editing my post with the exact same answer. –  gereeter Jun 20 '12 at 18:13
    
@greeter Thanks anyway :) –  Max Jun 20 '12 at 18:15

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