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I have a class A that looks like this:

class A {
// A's internal state
public:
  void someMethod();
  void anotherMethod();
};

I want to use A inside another class B. I don't want B to be a subtype of A, but I want A's public methods to be accessible in some form to B's users.

One way to accomplish this is by simply including an instance of A as a public member of B:

class B {
public:
  A a;
  // other members
};

Another is to have A be a private member of B, and provide wrappers around A's public methods:

class B {
  A a;
public:
  void someMethod(){ a.someMethod(); }
  void anotherMethod(){ a.anotherMethod(); }
}

I'd like to know if there's a "preferred" way of doing this (or even one that might not involve the two alternatives above), or if it's simply a matter of preference. Thanks.

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The hugest flaw with the first method is that it's possible for users of class B to write into a directly. This may be a bad thing. –  Mike Bantegui Jun 20 '12 at 18:32
1  
Or, half-way in between, you could make the member private, and provide a getA() method (which could returns a copy, reference, or const reference to the member, as appropriate to your needs). This will improve encapsulation in some cases (especially if getA doesn't return a non-const reference). –  abarnert Jun 20 '12 at 18:35
    
@abarnert: your suggestion is interesting, but in this case no initialization of a needs to happen, A's interface consists only of the two methods shown, and I need a reference (and not a copy) of a, so I think that implementing a getA() method would just create an unnecessary layer of indirection. However, as @Ed S. pointed out, this would ensure that my copy of a cannot simply be replaced by another one, which is a good thing :) –  abeln Jun 20 '12 at 18:45
1  
It sounds like for your use case, a getA method wouldn't add much as far as encapsulation, and of course it would be an extra layer of indirection, so the only reason I'd do that is if I wanted the indirection to be explicit (that is, I want B's users to know they're dealing with an A). –  abarnert Jun 20 '12 at 19:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'd like to know if there's a "preferred" way of doing this (or even one that might not involve the two alternatives above), or if it's simply a matter of preference. Thanks.

It really comes down to specifics here I'm afraid.

You're right in preferring composition over inheritance when inheritance doesn't make sense. How you implement that depends on whether or not it makes sense to make an instance of A public.

Is there any state in A that you do not want changed, or functions that you do not wish to be public? Do you wish to perform any pre- or post-pocessing when one of A's functions are called? Do you care is users set your instance of A to another? You probably do (though you could just make a getter function), so in this case prefer wrapping the functions.

Does it make more sense for A to be completely public? If so you save time by not writing a bunch of boilerplate code.

It really comes down to the semantics of your wrapper class here.

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The point you make about users being able to replace my copy of a with another is one I had not thought about. Thanks! –  abeln Jun 20 '12 at 18:47
1  
@abeln: No problem, though that could be solved with const A& get_a() const { return a; } –  Ed S. Jun 20 '12 at 18:48
    
Yeah, @abarnert had already suggested that in the comments to the question. –  abeln Jun 20 '12 at 18:51
    
on a second thought though, get_a() would prevent me from invoking non-const members from the const reference I get. –  abeln Jun 20 '12 at 19:18
1  
Yes, it would. If you need to get access to A by reference and call non-const methods on it, there's really no way to expose it without weakening encapsulation, which means you have to go with the explicit forwarding methods (or K-ballo's solution). –  abarnert Jun 20 '12 at 19:20

Yet another way is to do:

class B : private A
{
public:
    using A::someMethod;
    using A::anotherMethod;
};
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So this gives me the code reuse without the subtyping, right? –  abeln Jun 20 '12 at 18:33
1  
@abeln: Technically there still is subtyping, albeit private. –  K-ballo Jun 20 '12 at 18:34
    
@K-ballo: Private subclassing is not really subtyping. A B instance is not an A instance; it can't be assigned to an A pointer or bound to an A reference. (Except by B's methods, of course.) –  abarnert Jun 20 '12 at 18:37
1  
@abarnert: It can within the context of B and B's friends. –  K-ballo Jun 20 '12 at 18:38
1  
@abarnert: I think of non-accessible (to the outside world) subtyping to still be subtyping, just as I consider non-accessible members to still be members. –  K-ballo Jun 20 '12 at 19:18

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