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I know the title may sound like there were already dozens of similar questions, but I think that this one is a bit different. Still, if there already is a similar question to mine, please point me to it.

Basically, I have two tables: users and resumes. Below are snippets of their schemas:

users:
    id  signup_time
resumes:
    id  user_id  modified_time

Now, I need to fetch the total count of all users without a resume in a user-specified time frame (all dates are UNIX timestamps), grouped by day, week, or month - by date when they didn't have a resume uploaded, generally speaking. This is what bothers me the most, because if not for the grouping, the query could look like:

SELECT u.id FROM `jb_users` u WHERE
    u.id NOT IN (
        SELECT r.user_id FROM `jb_resumes` r
        WHERE (r.modified_time BETWEEN 1330581600 AND 1335848399)
    ) AND u.signup_time >= 1330581600

So for example, let's consider some examples. Hopefully it'll be easier to understand that way.

Suppose we have data:

users
    id  signup_time
    ---------------
    1   1340214369 (20.06.2012)
    2   1330754400 (03.03.2012)
    3   1329285600 (15.02.2012)
    4   1324447200 (21.12.2011)
resumes
    id  user_id  modified_time
    --------------------------
    1   1        1340214369 (20.06.2012)
    2   2        1330840800 (04.03.2012)
    3   2        1340214369 (20.06.2012)
    4   3        1334506920 (15.04.2012)
    5   3        1334638800 (17.04.2012)
    6   2        1334638800 (17.04.2012)
    7   3        1336798800 (12.05.2012)

For the timeframe 01.03.2012 00:00:00 - 30.04.2012 23:59:59 (grouped by month) it should return:

count   user_ids    time
2       3,4         1330840800 (03.2012 - can be any date in the month, in fact)
1       4           1334506920 (04.2012 - can be any date in the month, in fact)

For the same timeframe, but grouped daily, it should return:

count   user_ids    time
2       3,4         1330840800 (04.03.2012)
2       2,4         1334506920 (15.04.2012)
1       4           1334638800 (17.04.2012)

I hope the question is clear enough. If not, please let me know.

The data is going to be processed with PHP, so if that cannot be achieved using a single query (even with sub-queries), it's also okay to process the data with PHP.

Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
I'm totally confused by this statement: > by date when they didn't have a resume uploaded So, um, you need it grouped by the date on which they didn't submit a resume? –  Jason 'Bug' Fenter Jun 20 '12 at 18:39
    
Do you want group by day or month? Different queries or in same query? –  Somnath Muluk Jun 20 '12 at 18:40
    
@SomnathMuluk - I need to group it by day, week, and month. –  Pateman Jun 20 '12 at 18:41
    
@Jason'Bug'Fenter - yeah, it sounds stupid, but I need to put them on a graph, whose x-axis uses dates. So I need to calculate users who don't have any resume uploaded between the given timespan. –  Pateman Jun 20 '12 at 18:42
    
How come user_id 1 isn't in the example expected result set (under user_ids)? It does not have a resume that falls between between the date groups, so shouldn't it be included? –  Zane Bien Jun 20 '12 at 19:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is the solution I came up with for grouping by months. I've used your data in my local MySQL installation to test the results:

SELECT 
    COUNT(*) AS cnt,
    GROUP_CONCAT(b.id ORDER BY b.id) AS user_ids,
    a.monthgroup

FROM 
(
    SELECT MONTH(FROM_UNIXTIME(modified_time)) AS monthgroup
    FROM jb_resumes
    WHERE modified_time BETWEEN 
        UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2012-03-01 00:00:00') 
        AND UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2012-04-30 23:59:59')
    GROUP BY monthgroup
) a
CROSS JOIN 
    jb_users b
LEFT JOIN
    jb_resumes c ON 
        b.id = c.user_id 
        AND a.monthgroup = MONTH(FROM_UNIXTIME(modified_time))
WHERE
    b.signup_time < UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2012-04-30 23:59:59')
    AND c.user_id IS NULL
GROUP BY
    a.monthgroup
ORDER BY
    a.monthgroup

Result Set

It's a bit clunky, so I'm going to see if I can come up with a more elegant solution.

Solution for day grouping:

SELECT 
    COUNT(*) AS cnt,
    GROUP_CONCAT(b.id ORDER BY b.id) AS user_ids,
    a.daygroup

FROM 
(
    SELECT MAKEDATE(YEAR(FROM_UNIXTIME(modified_time)), DAYOFYEAR(FROM_UNIXTIME(modified_time))) AS daygroup
    FROM jb_resumes
    WHERE modified_time BETWEEN 
        UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2012-03-01 00:00:00') 
        AND UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2012-04-30 23:59:59')
    GROUP BY daygroup
) a
CROSS JOIN 
    jb_users b
LEFT JOIN
    jb_resumes c ON
        b.id = c.user_id
        AND a.daygroup = MAKEDATE(YEAR(FROM_UNIXTIME(modified_time)), DAYOFYEAR(FROM_UNIXTIME(modified_time)))
WHERE
    b.signup_time < UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2012-04-30 23:59:59')
    AND c.user_id IS NULL
GROUP BY
    a.daygroup
ORDER BY
    a.daygroup

Edit: Explanation of the month-grouping query:

Since you asked for an explanation of the solution, here is how I figured it out:

What we must first do is extract the month groupings from all modified_times within a timeframe:

SELECT MONTH(FROM_UNIXTIME(modified_time)) AS monthgroup
FROM jb_resumes
WHERE modified_time BETWEEN 
    UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2012-03-01 00:00:00') 
    AND UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2012-04-30 23:59:59')
GROUP BY monthgroup

Resulting in:

Step 1

Then in order to compare the combination of each monthgroup and each user to figure out which users do not have modified times within the monthgroup, we have to make a cartesian product between the monthgroup and all users. Since the query above is already using a GROUP BY, we cannot join directly in that query, but instead must wrap it in a subselect to go in the FROM clause:

SELECT 
    a.monthgroup,
    b.*
FROM 
(
    SELECT MONTH(FROM_UNIXTIME(modified_time)) AS monthgroup
    FROM jb_resumes
    WHERE modified_time BETWEEN 
        UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2012-03-01 00:00:00') 
        AND UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2012-04-30 23:59:59')
    GROUP BY monthgroup
) a
CROSS JOIN 
    jb_users b
--
ORDER BY a.monthgroup, b.id #for clarity's sake

Resulting in:

Step 2

Now we have the combination of monthgroups and all ids, but we do not want to include users who have a signup_time later than the time range, so we filter them out by introducing the first condition in our WHERE clause:

SELECT 
    a.monthgroup,
    b.*
FROM 
(
    SELECT MONTH(FROM_UNIXTIME(modified_time)) AS monthgroup
    FROM jb_resumes
    WHERE modified_time BETWEEN 
        UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2012-03-01 00:00:00') 
        AND UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2012-04-30 23:59:59')
    GROUP BY monthgroup
) a
CROSS JOIN 
    jb_users b
WHERE
    b.signup_time < UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2012-04-30 23:59:59')
--
ORDER BY a.monthgroup, b.id #for clarity's sake

Resulting in:

Step 3

Notice id 1 has been filtered out. Now we can make our comparison via LEFT JOIN:

SELECT 
    a.monthgroup,
    b.*,
    c.*
FROM 
(
    SELECT MONTH(FROM_UNIXTIME(modified_time)) AS monthgroup
    FROM jb_resumes
    WHERE modified_time BETWEEN 
        UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2012-03-01 00:00:00') 
        AND UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2012-04-30 23:59:59')
    GROUP BY monthgroup
) a
CROSS JOIN 
    jb_users b
LEFT JOIN
    jb_resumes c ON 
        b.id = c.user_id 
        AND a.monthgroup = MONTH(FROM_UNIXTIME(modified_time))
WHERE
    b.signup_time < UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2012-04-30 23:59:59')
--
ORDER BY a.monthgroup, b.id #for clarity's sake

Resulting in:

Step 4

Here we are LEFT JOINing on the condition that user has a resume modification in jb_resumes AND that the modification happened within in the month of the monthgroup value. If the user does not have a resume modification in that month, the LEFT JOIN returns NULL for values in the table. We WANT those users where the conditions do not satisfy, thus we must put our second condition in the WHERE clause:

SELECT 
    a.monthgroup,
    b.*,
    c.*
FROM 
(
    SELECT MONTH(FROM_UNIXTIME(modified_time)) AS monthgroup
    FROM jb_resumes
    WHERE modified_time BETWEEN 
        UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2012-03-01 00:00:00') 
        AND UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2012-04-30 23:59:59')
    GROUP BY monthgroup
) a
CROSS JOIN 
    jb_users b
LEFT JOIN
    jb_resumes c ON 
        b.id = c.user_id 
        AND a.monthgroup = MONTH(FROM_UNIXTIME(modified_time))
WHERE
    b.signup_time < UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2012-04-30 23:59:59')
    AND c.user_id IS NULL
--
ORDER BY a.monthgroup, b.id #for clarity's sake

Resulting in:

Step 5

Finally, we can group on the monthgroup field and put in our COUNT() and GROUP_CONCAT() functions:

SELECT 
    COUNT(*) AS cnt,
    GROUP_CONCAT(b.id ORDER BY b.id) AS user_ids,
    a.monthgroup

FROM 
(
    SELECT MONTH(FROM_UNIXTIME(modified_time)) AS monthgroup
    FROM jb_resumes
    WHERE modified_time BETWEEN 
        UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2012-03-01 00:00:00') 
        AND UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2012-04-30 23:59:59')
    GROUP BY monthgroup
) a
CROSS JOIN 
    jb_users b
LEFT JOIN
    jb_resumes c ON 
        b.id = c.user_id 
        AND a.monthgroup = MONTH(FROM_UNIXTIME(modified_time))
WHERE
    b.signup_time < UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2012-04-30 23:59:59')
    AND c.user_id IS NULL
GROUP BY
    a.monthgroup
ORDER BY
    a.monthgroup

Giving us the desired result:

Result Set

share|improve this answer
    
So far it looks and works VERY GOOD ! If you could explain the query, or even simply it, that would be more than perfect. If not, please let me know and I'll accept your answer anyway. –  Pateman Jun 20 '12 at 20:08
    
Day-grouping solution posted. I will edit this answer again later for detailed explanation and breakdown of intermediate result-sets. –  Zane Bien Jun 20 '12 at 20:14
    
I was able to figure out how to avoid using the NOT EXISTS correlated subquery, and replace it with a LEFT JOIN — Solution edited. –  Zane Bien Jun 20 '12 at 20:25
    
@ZaneBien , you might want to do some benchmarks on "LEFT JOIN" versus "NOT EXISTS". (The OP might want to, as well.) I found a couple of years ago that "NOT EXISTS" actually performed better, but as optimizers advance, I'm sure the difference is become more and more negligible. ... But that's even if performance is an issue. lol –  Jason 'Bug' Fenter Jun 20 '12 at 20:47
1  
Explanation posted. @Jason'Bug'Fenter, here is a good article on LEFT JOIN vs NOT IN/NOT EXISTS. You may have come across it before. I tend to prefer using JOINs as they can utilize indexes on related columns you're joining on. I don't like the idea of having a subquery execute for each row. Though I'm not too far up to speed with how the optimizer behaves, I'm sticking with LEFT JOINs until someone can convince me otherwise. =) –  Zane Bien Jun 20 '12 at 21:15

Try this :

   SELECT count(u.id) FROM `jb_users` u WHERE
        u.id NOT IN (
            SELECT distinct r.user_id FROM `jb_resumes` r
            WHERE (r.modified_time BETWEEN 1330581600 AND 1335848399)
 ) AND u.signup_time >= 1330581600 GROUP BY FROM_UNIXTIME(u.signup_time) ORDER BY u.signup_time

FROM_UNIXTIME will return unix timestamp into date format.

It will return the count of total users within a particular time range group by date. You can convert date format as per your requirement.

I added DISTINCT keyword in inner select query, because one user can update resume more than one time, so otherwise you can get that record also which does not even fall between that Date-range.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Nishu, but how is that query supposed to group by date? –  Pateman Jun 20 '12 at 18:44
    
I think his question is actually about how to do the groupings for the outer query. BTW, Pateman, I think the order by in the subselect needs to be removed -- it's not useful and could slow down the query. –  ametren Jun 20 '12 at 18:44
    
@ametren, yeah, you're right. I was just experimenting and forgot to throw it out. –  Pateman Jun 20 '12 at 18:46
    
No worries. I'm still trying to figure out how I'd approach the solution. –  ametren Jun 20 '12 at 18:50
    
@ametren: yeah, I missed it, i edited my answer. Please have a look on it. –  Nishu Tayal Jun 20 '12 at 18:56

Not sure if this would work but you might try a join with an if.

SELECT DISTINCT
if(r.modified_time NOT BETWEEN 1330581600 AND 1335848399, u.id, null) as UID
FROM `jb_users` u 
Left Join `jb_resumes` r ON u.id = r.user_id
WHERE
u.signup_time >= 1330581600
share|improve this answer
    
@SuperMykEI, please have a look at the desired output which I'm expecting. –  Pateman Jun 20 '12 at 19:06

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