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Should I merge those tables into one table? Is there any tricky alternative?

Table Unit for a Template table:


Id (PK)
ParentId
Name
TemplateId (FK)

Table Unit2 for a Testplan table:

Id (PK)
ParentId
Name
TestplanId (FK)

Edit:

Why not make a table like that:

[UnitId] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [Name] [nvarchar](50) NOT NULL,
    [TemplateId] [int] NULL,
    [TestplanId] [int] NULL,
    [ParentId] [int] NULL,

Update2:

1 Template has N Unit
1 Template has N Testplan
1 Testplan has N Unit

These are the relations using one Unit table. But this could only work with a TemplateId AND TestplanId in the Unit table.

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1  
What's the relationship between the objects stored in the original two tables? Is there a one-to-one relationship? Is the parent of a template always a template? Is every template a testplan or vice versa? Try answering these in the question. –  Nick Vaccaro Jun 20 '12 at 20:01
    
@Norla My question is updated. –  Elisabeth Jun 21 '12 at 17:33
    
Well, it looks like there are 3 different types of objects at work here: templates, testplans and units. To be more specific: Template, TemplateUnit, Testplan, TestplanUnit. Does that sound correct? –  Nick Vaccaro Jun 21 '12 at 17:55
    
Yes 4 table but they could be 3 tables if the TestplanUnit and templateUnit are merged. –  Elisabeth Jun 21 '12 at 17:58

6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Following from comments in question:

Trying to reduce the number of tables is going to obfuscate their intended purposes. When you are trying to design a relational database of object, ask yourself two questions about each relationship. Is A a B? Does A have a B?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Is-a

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Has-a

You've got a series of has-a relationships. (Specifically, has-many) Template has units. Template has testplans. Testplan has units (but, as you'll see, different units)

For each has-many relationships, you'll add a foreign key column to the property table, e.g., the unit would have a template_id.

Template
----------
id
<other columns>

TemplateUnit
----------
id
template_id (FK)
parent_id (FK) -- references same table?
name
<other columns>

Testplan 
----------
id
template_id (FK)
<other columns>

TestplanUnit
---------
id
testplan_id (FK)
parent_id (FK)
name
<other columns>

With a schema like this, there's no confusion as to what tables and what columns relate to what other objects. This makes querying very easy as well.

SELECT *
FROM Template a
JOIN TemplateUnit b
    ON a.id = b.template_id
JOIN Testplan c
    ON a.id = c.template_id
JOIN TestplanUnit d
    ON c.id = d.testplan_id

Now you know that all b columns are template units and all d columns are testplan units. Easy peasy.

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the parent_id is no FK its just a field having the id of another datarow of the same table (hierarchical stuff). What I liked is: "Trying to reduce the number of tables is going to obfuscate their intended purposes", BUT I am the only one coding here ;-) When I would have a TemplateUnit and a TestplanUnit I would ask is TemplateUnit a Unit and is TestplanUnit a Unit. I would answer both with YES. Thus I have actually inheritance here which is answered in Tim Lehner`s solution. –  Elisabeth Jun 21 '12 at 18:25
    
The Unit table is going to require the FK column, which is either going to be template_id or testplan_id. You can't have both without seriously messing up the schema. (research 3NF) Also, think of a parent_id in the same way that you would think of any other FK column. That's actually what it is! The parent_id is the id of a different entity, regardless of whether or not it's a different table. (Think in terms of rows, not tables.) –  Nick Vaccaro Jun 21 '12 at 18:30
    
I should expand a bit. A TemplateUnit has a parent Template. A TestplanUnit has a parent Testplan. Those are two different relationships that should not be confused. –  Nick Vaccaro Jun 21 '12 at 18:32
    
"Think in term of rows..." Well I make my relations usually with tables not rows. Sounds odd what you tell me hihi. What do you not like about Tim Lehner`s inheritance suggestions? Its totally against your solution?! –  Elisabeth Jun 21 '12 at 18:37
    
Very politely - I am completely against it. Every time I've chosen a solution that denormalizes the database (when absolutely not required), I get burned. Also, his example doesn't support the N-to-1 relationship you outlined, so it wouldn't work anyway. –  Nick Vaccaro Jun 21 '12 at 18:47

No, similar but unrelated tables shouldn't be merged.

They differ in a foreign key column. There is no easy way to make a foreign key that sometimes points at one table and sometimes at another.

In your update you've handled this situation by adding two columns - one for each foreign key - and you have made them both nullable. But imagine that you now want to require that every template has exactly one template id. In your original design you can easily achieve this by making the TemplateId column NOT NULL. But you can't do that in your combined table because it would prevent you from creating Testplans.

Now imagine if someone added an item that had both a TestplanId and a TemplateId... is that something you want to allow? In your old design this was impossible, but in your combined table it can be done.

This situations can be handled by adding a CHECK constraint, but it adds extra complication with little or no benefit.

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I updated my question. –  Elisabeth Jun 20 '12 at 19:53

No. Because they store unrelated information.
In your example Template and Testplan are totally unrelated entities, so they should not be combined into one table.

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A Unit.TemplateId references a Template.Id, in which way is that totally unrelated? –  Elisabeth Jun 20 '12 at 19:55
    
What is the relation between Template and Testplan? –  Padmarag Jun 20 '12 at 19:57

You can readily combine these two tables into a single table with the following columns:

Id (PK)
ParentId
Name
TemplateId (FK) 
TestplanId (FK)

Is this a good idea or not? Well this depends. Are the two tables containing essentially the same entity? If this question is hard to answer, think about whether you will be doing union's on the two tables to satisfy queries.

Both have a ParentId column. Is the parent always of the same type as the child? Or is the parent something else entirely? If you have a mixed tree structure, then you would want all the ids in a single table. If you have a two different tree structures, then you might want two different tables.

Similarly, if there are id's that have both TemplateId and TestplanId, then it is probably a good idea to put them in the same table. Likewise, if there are id's that have neither, then it is probably a good idea to put them all in a single table.

You can place a foreign key constraint on the original two tables, and insist that the key is never NULL. In the one-table version, you can't quite do this. You could add a constraint that says that at least one of the two keys (or exactly one) is NULL.

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If your goal is to mimic inheritance, I recommend reading about discriminator columns first and then altering your proposed table accordingly.

If your goal is to provide a common Unit table for many entities to share, you might try something like this:

create table UnitList (
      Id int not null primary key
)

create table Unit (
      Id int not null primary key
    , ParentId int null
    , Name nvarchar(50) not null
    , UnitListId int not null references UnitList (Id)
)

create table Template (
      Id int not null primary key
    , UnitListId int not null references UnitList (Id)
)

create table Testplan (
      Id int not null primary key
    , UnitListId int not null references UnitList (Id)
)

At that point, you'll probably want to put some unique constraints on the Unit table according to your business rules. If you wanted no duplication in your Unit table, but wanted to allow a unit to be in many lists, you could create a UnitToList junction as well.

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How is the UnitList table used in the context of CRUD methods? I mean I fill my Unit,Template and Testplan like I did before. What do I with the UnitList? Above now I still have 2 tables Unit and UnitList... –  Elisabeth Jun 21 '12 at 17:46
    
If I add units for a template/testplan in the Unit table I need to allow duplicates for the name of a unit. Normally a testplan gets all units from a template (if a template is removed all its units are gone, but not the units of a testplan this must be untouched). –  Elisabeth Jun 21 '12 at 18:32

Even if both tables look very similar and repetitive, I don't think you should merge them. While they are not connected in any way, they meant to stay distinct tables.

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