Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it possible to concatenate a variable to itself a such?

@varA: "hello ";
@varB: "world";

@varA: "@{varA}@{varB}";

(to output "hello world")

I am able to do this,

@varA: "hello ";
@varB: "world";

@varC: "@{varA}@{varB}";

But something about using the variable in itself seems to break everything. Is this a LESS bug ?

share|improve this question
    
Did you ever notice my answer? You voted yours up but it was incorrect, you might consider voting mine up so that others know this is possible (and was in 1.3 as well, you just had the wrong syntax). –  jonschlinkert Dec 20 '12 at 9:07
    
Did you notice my question? I specifically state in the latter half that I am not looking to do what you suggest as an answer. I want to append a variable to itself. I think my question states this pretty explicitly. –  ajkochanowicz Dec 20 '12 at 14:28
    
Maybe you need to clarify your actual (first) SO QUESTION, which was "Is it possible to concatenate a variable to itself as such?" And the answer is yes. And then you say "But something about using the variable in itself seems to break everything" Which is a statement, and I'm not even sure what you mean there. I don't have any problems achieving what's stated in the actual question asked. So do you want me to focus on your second question, "Is this a LESS bug?". Because the answer to that is, "No". And your syntax is incorrect. –  jonschlinkert Dec 20 '12 at 19:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just installed less to try it out and indeed, trying it the first way I get

stack_overflowError: Maximum call stack size exceeded in <file>
1 @varB: "world";

In fact, assigning a variable to itself results in the same error. I have looked around at the source and I can't say for certain what causes it (although due to the nature of the error, we can guess fairly easily). As far as documentation goes, it mentions that the variables are constants, however after doing some tests, I found that you can in fact define a new variable with the same name as the old one. So:

@vA = "hi";
@vA = "hello";

will actually work, and when you use vA later on, it will have a value of "hello". I recommend that you simply use a temporary variable, if you actually find that you need it.

Just keep @tmp around and use it when you want to, as long as you don't try to define a new @tmp in terms of itself.

share|improve this answer

Try this

@varA: hello;
@varB: world;

@varC: @varA@varB;


.test {
  text: @varC;
}

It results in this when compiled

.test {
  text: hello world;
}

Or try this:

@varA: hello;
@varB: world;

@varC: "@{varA} @{varB}";


.test {
  text: @varC;
}

To get this:

.test {
  text: "hello world";
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.