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Is there any keyboard shortcut to move the cursor between methods in Visual Studio? Is there any plugins that can do the same job?

All the time when I program, I want to go at the end of the current method and if I could have a shortcut that can move the cursor at the beginning of the next method and then just have to type a couple of up arrow to be where I want would be fantastic.

Thank you.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Visual Studio doesn't have such a function, but JetBrains' ReSharper does. At least is the only one that I know of to offer this functionality.

For ReSharper the shortcuts are Alt-Up and Alt-Down, for previous/next member.

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1  
This is exactly what I want! We CANNOT lives without Resharper!!! :D Thank you very much. –  Samuel Jun 20 '12 at 21:28
3  
It's worth mentioning that VB does have this under Edit > Next/Previous method towards the end of list. –  Jason Malinowski Jun 21 '12 at 0:12
    
Why the downvote? –  Marcel N. Oct 12 '13 at 10:03

Try CTRL + ALT + UP. This first takes you to the scope selector where you can select a class if applicable, then press TAB which takes you to the method selector where you can select a method from the selected scope.

Note I use In Visual Studio 2012, don't know if works in other versions.

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i use VS 2010. (i cannot stand the colors in VS 2012. :(( ) And in VS 2010, this works j ust as described. Thanks for mentioning this! –  Shawn Kovac Feb 28 '14 at 16:34
    
I tried ctrl + alt + down and it turned my screen upside down –  Eduardo Wada Apr 27 at 13:10

This can be manually set up, at least for the VB.NET code editor. While there are no default keyboard bindings to jump between methods, you can set them up yourself:

Go to ToolsCustomize…, then Keyboard…, and do the following:

  1. Search for the commands by typing Method in the input line at the top.

  2. Locate the two commands Edit.NextMethod and Edit.PreviousMethod.

  3. For each of these, select the command first, then move the input focus to the input field Press shortcut keys and enter a unassigned key combination.

  4. Finally, save your new keybindings by pressing OK (then Close in the previous window).

Options dialog where keyboard bindings can be set up and modified

(The screenshot above shows that I have previously assigned one of these commands to Ctrl+Shift+<.)

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2  
+1 for the effort even I already have accept another answer. Thank you for your time. Without Resharper, this is a good solution. –  Samuel Dec 11 '13 at 21:02
    
it is not under "Tools, Customize" (in VS 2010 which i use). but the pic helped me find that it was really under "Tools, Options" instead. i was able to assign a shortcut key now, and it's great. Thanks!! –  Shawn Kovac Feb 28 '14 at 16:40
    
This is absolutely the correct answer and as a bonus it doesn't require us to buy and configure resharper. –  Mat Fergusson Nov 18 '14 at 12:41

Jason Malinowski is right on his comment. It even says the shortcut keys are Ctrl+Down Arrow and Ctrl+Up Arrow. I used to use this all the time in VB6, but when I tried it lately using recent versions of visual studio, it didn't work; it would just scroll the edit window up or down one line.

When I went into Tools -> Options, select "Environment" on the left, and then the subcategory of "Keyboard", then type "Edit.ScrollLineDown" it said "Ctrl+Down Arrow". When I removed this shortcut (and the one for ScrollLineUp), the next/previous method shortcuts then worked! I'm personally very happy about this.

Obviously, if you can find the right command, you can customize your keyboard shortcuts any way you please here.

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Hi another (cheaper) alternative might be the CTRL+M+M to collapse/expand the current method to it's definition, allowing you to quickly navigate to the next. Also CTRL+M+O to collapse all members is useful, with CTRL+M+L to expand all again.

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