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According to the Puppet documentation:

Order does not matter in a declarative language.

If that is the case, why does this bit of code work:

class myserver {
  $package_to_install = 'libcapture-tiny-perl'
  package {
   $package_to_install: ensure => present;
  }
}

but this code does not work:

class myserver {
  package {
   $package_to_install: ensure => present;
  }
  $package_to_install = 'libcapture-tiny-perl'
}

If order matters, then I can see why one works and the other does not, but since order does not matter, why do they behave differently?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Disclaimer: I am one of the Puppet developers.

Because our language isn't, as our documentation claims, actually declarative. It is actually ordered. :(

Evaluation is more or less top to bottom inside the class or declaration. The product of that evaluation is a resource in the catalog, however, not evaluation of the catalog.

Think of the DSL as a not-entirely-declarative way to build the catalog, a graph of resources, that are entirely declarative in processing.

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Do you have a pointer to some Puppet Labs document that might explain in some detail how the language is compiled and executed? –  rlandster Jun 20 '12 at 20:44
    
Sadly, no, there isn't. I added some more explanation into the answer though. –  Daniel Pittman Jun 20 '12 at 20:50
    
So, a Puppet DSL file gets pre-compiled in the "normal" imperative manner into a structure that represents a graph of resources which is order-independent (modulo explicit dependencies). Is that correct? –  rlandster Jun 20 '12 at 21:23
    
Roughly speaking, yes. That summary is unlikely to steer you wrong. –  Daniel Pittman Jun 20 '12 at 21:24

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