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I have two classes, one that inherits from the other. The base class is MustInherit/abstract and defines a MustOverride/abstract property.

As part of the base classes initialization, it sets a variable based on the value of the abstract property. The problem is that the inheriting class accepts as its parameter the value which should be assigned to the overriden property. The inherited class sets this property, but not before calling the base class' initializer.

Basically, I need to initialize part of the base class, then allow the inheriting class to initialize some of its properties, then return to the base class to finish initializing more properties.

I would make the property part of the base class, but the inheriting classes employ strong typing whereas the base class only needs an interface.

Code example:

MustInherit Class A
  MustOverride Property X As IExample

  Sub New()
    ' Do some stuff
    _privateY = X.Foo() ' NullReferenceException
  End Sub
End Class

Class B
  Inherits A

  Override Property X As IExample ' returns StrongX
  Property StrongX As ConcreteExample ' ConcreteExample implements IExample

  Sub New(x As ConcreteExample)
    MyBase.New(x)
    StrongX = x
  End Sub
End Class
share|improve this question
    
(Tagged as both C# and VB.NET as it is relevant to both languages, though I'm eager for more relevant tags if there are suggestions.) –  JDB Jun 20 '12 at 20:45
    
Just because C# and VB.NET are both OO does not mean that this question qualifies as a C# one. –  Kirk Woll Jun 20 '12 at 20:47
    
This question has nothing to do with C#!!! –  SASS_Shooter Jun 20 '12 at 20:57
    
Though I'm using both languages in this project, I realize that this question does not fit perfectly under either VB.NET or C#. Yet, the OOP implementation details are specific to the .NET family of languages. –  JDB Jun 21 '12 at 4:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It is exactly for this reason that abstract members should not be called in the constructor. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms182331(v=vs.100).aspx

If you have control of the abstract class I would suggest passing the value in through the base class constructor.

public abstract class A
{
    public A(IExample x)
    {
        // Do Stuff
        var _privateY = x.Foo();
    }
}

public class B : A
{
    public B(IExample x):base(x)    {}
}
share|improve this answer
    
Could even have public B() : base(new ConcreteExample()) –  Chris Sinclair Jun 20 '12 at 21:12
    
As Eric Lippert says, "its a bad programming practice to call virtual methods from constructors. The reason it is a bad idea to call virtual methods from constructors is because a method on a derived class might run before the derived class constructor runs." <blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2008/02/18/…; Kevin's solution is elegant and has the right idea. –  Alan McBee Jun 20 '12 at 21:19
    
Thanks for the documentation. The constructor parameter approach occurred to me, but I'm not a big fan as it makes the number of parameters feel excessive and might give the wrong impression that the base class is somehow setting the property (or should be). It is looking like the only option, though. –  JDB Jun 21 '12 at 4:47
1  
It's not bad at all @Cyborgx37, it's a nice method of dependency injection. Class A literally requires that it has an implementation of IExample, so putting it as a constructor fulfills that need every time and makes it instantly recognizable by any developer creating the subclasses. (though you may want to consider a null check, perhaps as a Debug.Assert). It's also ok for the base class to set the property. Perhaps instead you can make the property public get; private set; and ditch the abstract? –  Chris Sinclair Jun 21 '12 at 11:29
1  
Thanks @Chris. Sometimes you get so wrapped up in a particular implementation that you need someone else to point out the obvious. I think I will ditch the abstract - there's really no compelling reason for it. –  JDB Jun 21 '12 at 13:17

EDIT: Sorry, my answer is in C# :(

One option would be to have the base abstract class call virtual (or abstract) initialization methods that the subclass can implement:

public abstract class A
{
    public abstract IExample X { get; set; }

    private object _privateY;

    protected A()
    {
        PreInit();

        PostInit();
    }

    protected abstract void PreInit();

    protected virtual void PostInit()
    {
        if (X == null)
            throw new InvalidOperationException("Must assign a value to X.");

        _privateY = X.Foo();
    }
}

Then in B, override PreInit and assign your data:

public class B : A
{
    public override IExample X { get; set; }

    public B()
    {

    }

    protected override void PreInit()
    {
        X = new ConcreteExample();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I like the idea here, but I'm not initializing the ConcreteExample in B... it is being passed as a constructor parameter. Also, there would be no way of ensuring that some future C will handle the PreInit properly (which is likely as it is not very intuitive what belongs where). Thanks though. –  JDB Jun 21 '12 at 4:50
    
Yeah, I mostly agree that that's the preferred case. I just threw this up here as an option to consider (as we don't know what exactly your application design is like) and since Keven beat me to it. –  Chris Sinclair Jun 21 '12 at 11:31

You could use a Lazy<T>:

public abstract class A
{
    private Lazy<IExample> _privateY = new Lazy(() => this.X.Foo());
}
share|improve this answer
    
Class A does not implement IExample, it is a property. I actually hadn't considered lazy loading, although it makes for some very nasty debugging scenarios. That's one of my biggest gripes with LINQ. –  JDB Jun 21 '12 at 4:26

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