Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The JavaScript code below is executed every time the user selects the login button on my webpage, the function basically ensures that the username and password fields have received text (and then strips away any leading or trailing white space) and then redirects the browser to the php login script. The code works perfectly in IE, Firefox and Opera yet it doesn't in Safari and Chrome.

In Safari and Chrome, the textbox values are undefined. Other browsers return the values typed perfectly.

var button;
var name;
var pass;

function logIn()
{

    name.value = name.value.replace(/^\s+|\s+$/g,"");
    pass.value = pass.value.replace(/^\s+|\s+$/g,"");

    if(name.value == "")
    {

        alert("Please Enter A Username");

    }

    else if(pass.value == "")
    {

        alert("Please Enter A Password");

    }

    else
    {

        window.location.href = "loginScript.php?username=" + name.value + "&password=" + pass.value;

    }

}

function onLoad()
{

    button = document.getElementById('button');
    name = document.getElementById('username');
    pass = document.getElementById('password');

    button.onclick = logIn;

}

window.onload = onLoad;
share|improve this question
3  
I would suggest not putting the password in the URL. –  11684 Jun 20 '12 at 20:52
    
Where is name and pass assigned? –  Musa Jun 20 '12 at 20:53
    
what happens in Safari or Chrome if you don't strip the whitespace off? –  11684 Jun 20 '12 at 20:54
    
@Musa in onLoad(). –  11684 Jun 20 '12 at 20:54
2  
at least hash the password before putting it in the URL. –  11684 Jun 20 '12 at 20:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I believe the variable you're using, name, is a reserved keyword in Chrome.

Try changing the name variable to something like username.

var button;
var username;
var password;

function logIn()
{

    username.value = username.value.replace(/^\s+|\s+$/g,"");
    pass.value = pass.value.replace(/^\s+|\s+$/g,"");

    if(username.value == "")
    {

        alert("Please Enter A Username");

    }

    else if(password.value == "")
    {

        alert("Please Enter A Password");

    }

    else
    {

        window.location.href = "loginScript.php?username=" + username.value + "&password=" + password.value;

    }

}

function onLoad()
{

    button = document.getElementById('button');
    username = document.getElementById('username');
    password= document.getElementById('password');

    button.onclick = logIn;

}

window.onload = onLoad;

EDIT: Changed pass to password as well

share|improve this answer
    
Thats's exactly it!!! Thanks so much...that's been driving me insane for hours! –  slickboy Jun 20 '12 at 21:05
1  
If you had printed your name and pass variables to the Chrome console you'd see that they print out differently. It's because the pass variable contains a valid DOM element and name had.. something else. console.log(name,pass); –  TheZ Jun 20 '12 at 21:06
    
Thanks again....I'm a bit old fashioned when it comes to testing javascript just...I usually just make do with alert(variableName)! –  slickboy Jun 20 '12 at 21:09
1  
Haha, I used to until I discovered just how powerful the dev console is! You can expand objects, arrays, and DOM elements to see their properties and attributes. Very, VERY useful ;) –  TheZ Jun 20 '12 at 21:09
    
This solution works perfectly in Chrome however not in Safari...i'm assumming pass is also a reserved keyword in the webkit used by Safari (based on the fact it is highlighted in the above codeblock)...by changing pass to another variable name such as pw resolves this problem (in the same manner as suggested by @TheZ)! –  slickboy Jun 20 '12 at 21:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.