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Lest I suffer a bout of tedium tremens (roughly a cross between delerium tremens and carpal tunnel syndrome), I need to find a way to automate the parsing of a large file of sql statements and their parameter values.

I have a file with gazillions of sql statements in this format:

select Animal#, RacketThreshold, PeakOil as Oil
from OilAnimalPlatypus2
where OilAnimalPlatypusID = :ID
  and Animal# = :Animal
  and TelecasterAccessType = 'D'
UNION
select Animal, RacketThreshold, PeakOil as Oil
from OilRequestPlatypus
where PlatypusID = :ID
  and Animal = :Animal
order by RacketThreshold

-->ID(VARCHAR[0])=<NULL> 
:Animal(INTEGER)=2

...namely multi-line sql statements followed by a blank line followed by two dashes and an arrow with the parameter names, data types, and arguments followed by the same thing over and over ad infinitum ad nauseum (except where the sql statements have no parameters).

I want to make from this great gob of goo a separate string for each unique query (many of them are the same, albeit oftentimes with different argument values assigned the params). If possible, I'd also like to keep track of all the argument values passed to a particular query (e.g., if it is called the first time and passed a "1" for a particular param, the next time a "42", the next time "3.14" etc.), I want a collection of 1, 42, 3.14 for that arg name.

There are over 400 queries, and I loathe the thought of doing this all "by hand" - especially the comparing of queries for matches.

UPDATED

Okay, after adding this code to use Jon's:

private void buttonOpenAndParseSQLMonFile_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    var queriesAndArgs = (Dictionary<string, List<string>>)ParseFile("SQLMonTraceLog.txt");
    foreach(var pair in queriesAndArgs)
    {
        richTextBoxParsedResults.AppendText(pair.Key);
        richTextBoxParsedResults.AppendText(Environment.NewLine);
        foreach (String s in pair.Value)
        {
            richTextBoxParsedResults.AppendText(s);
            richTextBoxParsedResults.AppendText(Environment.NewLine);
        }
        richTextBoxParsedResults.AppendText(Environment.NewLine);
    }
}

...I get these type of results in my richTextBox:

select ABCID from ABCWorker where lower(loginid) = lower(user) 


select r.roleid from abcrole r, abcworker w where lower(w.loginid)=lower(user)   and r.abcid=w.abcid   and r.status='A'


select Tier#, BenGrimm, PeakRate as Ratefrom RageAnimalGreenBayPackers2 where RageAnimalGreenBayPackersID = :ID and Tier# = 

:Tier and FlyingVAccessType = 'D' UNION select Tier, BenGrimm, PeakRate as Rate from CaliforniaCondorGreenBayPackers where 

GreenBayPackersID = :ID and Tier = :Tier order by BenGrimm 
-->   :ID(VARCHAR[0])=<NULL> :Tier(INTEGER)=1 
-->  :ID(VARCHAR[0])=<NULL> :Tier(INTEGER)=1 
-->  :ID(VARCHAR[0])=<NULL> :Tier(INTEGER)=1 
-->  :ID(VARCHAR[0])=<NULL> :Tier(INTEGER)=4 


select Tier#, BenGrimm, PeakRate as Rate from RageAnimalGreenBayPackers2 where RageAnimalGreenBayPackersID = :ID and Tier# = 

:Tier and FlyingVAccessType = 'D' UNION select Tier, BenGrimm, PeakRate as Rate from CaliforniaCondorGreenBayPackers where 

GreenBayPackersID = :ID and Tier = :Tier order by BenGrimm 
-->  :ID(VARCHAR[0])=<NULL> :Tier(INTEGER)=2 
-->  :ID(VARCHAR[0])=<NULL> :Tier(INTEGER)=5 
-->  :ID(VARCHAR[0])=<NULL> :Tier(INTEGER)=1 
-->  :ID(VARCHAR[0])=<NULL> :Tier(INTEGER)=2 
-->  :ID(VARCHAR[0])=<NULL> :Tier(INTEGER)=3 
-->  :ID(VARCHAR[0])=<NULL> :Tier(INTEGER)=4 
-->  :ID(VARCHAR[0])=<NULL> :Tier(INTEGER)=2 
-->  :ID(VARCHAR[0])=<NULL> :Tier(INTEGER)=3 
-->  :ID(VARCHAR[0])=<NULL> :Tier(INTEGER)=4 
(etc.)

...so, this has been very instructive, but I see that it's not QUITE what I need, plus it depends on my lamo hand-tweaking of the file. SO, I think I need to take a step back and parse the file as it is actually given to me, with incrementing numbers separating each "interesting" event:

. . .
6       11:30:46  SQL Execute: select ABCID
from ABCWorker
where lower(loginid) = lower(user)
7       11:30:46  SQL Prepare: select r.roleid from abcrole r, abcworker w where lower(w.loginid)=lower(user)   and     
r.abcid=w.abcid   and r.status='A'
8       11:30:46  SQL Execute: select r.roleid from abcrole r, abcworker w where lower(w.loginid)=lower(user)   and     
r.abcid=w.abcid   and r.status='A'
9       11:30:46  SQL Execute: select Tier#, BenGrimm, PeakRate as Rate
from RageAnimalGreenBayPackers2
where RageAnimalGreenBayPackersID = :ID
  and Tier# = :Tier
  and FlyingVAccessType = 'D'
UNION
select Tier, BenGrimm, PeakRate as Rate
from CaliforniaCondorGreenBayPackers
where GreenBayPackersID = :ID
  and Tier = :Tier
order by BenGrimm
10      11:30:46  :ID(VARCHAR[0])=<NULL> 
:Tier(INTEGER)=1
11      11:30:46  SQL Execute: select Tier#, BenGrimm, PeakRate as Rate
from RageAnimalGreenBayPackers2
where RageAnimalGreenBayPackersID = :ID
  and Tier# = :Tier
  and FlyingVAccessType = 'D'
UNION
select Tier, BenGrimm, PeakRate as Rate
from CaliforniaCondorGreenBayPackers
where GreenBayPackersID = :ID
  and Tier = :Tier
order by BenGrimm
12      11:30:46  :ID(VARCHAR[0])=<NULL> 
:Tier(INTEGER)=2
. . .
share|improve this question
    
What do you use to separate these queries from each other? – Jon Senchyna Jun 20 '12 at 21:07
2  
Absolutely; if you open the text file using a StreamReader (see msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa287535(v=vs.71).aspx), and read it a line at a time you can segment your reads every time you read a file that is String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace or just consists of a \r\n character. – dash Jun 20 '12 at 21:10
    
Who is porviding this file and can you ask them to give it to you in a differnt format? I would tend to send this type of thing back to the orginator and put the onus on them to make it a useable format. – HLGEM Jun 20 '12 at 21:14
    
Do you have several queries like this, in a single file or string ? Or, do you have a separate file for each query & its parameters ? – umlcat Jun 20 '12 at 21:16
    
Are you missing a ':' before your ID parameter in the arguments list, or is the first parameter always missing it? – Jon Senchyna Jun 20 '12 at 21:24
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Assuming you are separating your queries from each other by another blank line, you could try using the following to parse your files. The code will read through the file until the end. Each call to parseQuery will read in lines until it finds a blank line, and append them together as your query. It will then check the next line, if it is not the beginning of an argument block, it willsave the query with no arguments, and start over, assuming that it is at the beginning of another query. If that line is the beginning of an argument block, the code will read until it hits another blank line, save the query and it's arguments, and then return. The while(parseQuery) will ensure that the entire file gets parsed.

In the end, the code spits out a dictionary containing a query string as the key, and a list of strings as the different arguments supplied. Error checking has been left out for simplicity. In a real-world scenario, you'd want to add handling for things like the file not existing.

static IDictionary<string, List<string>> ParseFile(string path)
{
    Dictionary<string, List<string>> queries = new Dictionary<string, List<string>>();
    using (var reader = File.OpenText(path))
    {
        while (parseQuery(reader, queries)) { }
    }
    return queries;
}

private static bool parseQuery(StreamReader reader, Dictionary<string, List<string>> queries)
{
    StringBuilder sbQuery = new StringBuilder();
    StringBuilder sbArgs = new StringBuilder();
    // Read in query
    bool moreLines = ParseBlock(reader, sbQuery);
    if (moreLines)
    {
        while (moreLines)
        {
            string line = reader.ReadLine();
            // Check for the beginning of an args block.
            if (line != null && line.StartsWith("-->"))
            {
                // Read in args
                sbArgs.Append(line);
                moreLines = ParseBlock(reader, sbArgs);
                break;
            }
            // If this is not an args block, it is a new query
            // Save the last query and start over
            else
            {
                AddQuery(queries, sbQuery.ToString(), sbArgs.ToString());
                sbQuery = new StringBuilder();
                sbQuery.Append(line); // Make sure we capture the last line
                moreLines = ParseBlock(reader, sbQuery);
            }
        }
    }
    AddQuery(queries, sbQuery.ToString(), sbArgs.ToString());
    return moreLines;
}

private static bool ParseBlock(StreamReader reader, StringBuilder builder)
{
    string line;
    while ((line = reader.ReadLine()) != null)
    {
        line = line.Trim();
        if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(line)) break;

        builder.Append(line + " ");
    }
    return line != null;
}

private static void AddQuery(Dictionary<string, List<string>> queries, string query, string args)
{
    if (query.Length > 0)
    {
        List<string> lstParams;
        if (!queries.TryGetValue(query, out lstParams))
        {
            lstParams = new List<string>();
        }
        lstParams.Add(args);
        queries[query] = lstParams;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for me for the more developed answer; there's no work left to do with this one ;-) – dash Jun 20 '12 at 22:00
    
There is definitely room for improvement here. This is fairly hacked together. I'd recommend taking some time to look through it, figuring out how it works, and adding some error handling and perhaps refactoring a bit. – Jon Senchyna Jun 20 '12 at 22:01
    
Oh, it's not production ready, but it does give Clay a list of queries and the associated list of arguments. It also made me go look up the fact that String.IsNullOrWhitespace will also match line breaks, so I learned something too. Thanks! – dash Jun 20 '12 at 22:03
    
<<In a real-world scenario, you'd want to add handling for things like the file not existing.>> That's what ReSharper is for. In fact, I think I will start a new programming style acronym: LP, for Lazy Programming. – B. Clay Shannon Jun 20 '12 at 22:38

What you really need is a lexical analyzer. Check out ANTLR - http://www.antlr.org/

You will need to define your "grammar", that is what are the characteristics of each element of your language (your file of SQL in this case). Then in the end, ANTLR was process your file and spit out results of what if found based on our grammar definition.

It's just a tokenize and parse process.

share|improve this answer
    
It seems overkill for this particular case; that is, the question is not really about parsing SQL. The "SQL goo" is just an opaque structure here, it is only the -->... stuff that has structural relevance... – user166390 Jun 20 '12 at 21:18
    
Yes, of course. You wouldn't be creating a grammar to parse SQL, you would be creating a grammar to parse what information you want to extract. – EkoostikMartin Jun 20 '12 at 21:21
    
It's somewhat awkward to create a token for "ALL THAT GOO" in Antlr... – user166390 Jun 20 '12 at 21:22
    
Why is it awkward? The "goo" does appear to have a format pattern that it follows. – EkoostikMartin Jun 20 '12 at 21:41
    
I can imagine that last comment ending up at the bottom of the page as the quote of the day on /. one of these days. – B. Clay Shannon Jun 20 '12 at 21:43

Here's a concrete example of my comment; You could do this quite simply by using a StreamReader and collect each block into a List; for example:

string line = String.Empty;

List<String> statementBlocks = new List<String>();

System.IO.StreamReader file = new System.IO.StreamReader("C:\\temp\\annoying_text_file.sql");

StringBuilder blockCollector = new StringBuilder();

//read the file a line at a time
while((line = file.ReadLine()) != null)
{
  //If the line has content, then we append it to our string builder 
  if(!String.IsNullOrWhitespace(line)) //String.IsNullOrWhitespace is new in .Net 4 and will also match the new line
  {
      blockCollector.AppendLine(line);
  }
  else
  {
       //we've hit a blank line - dump it to the list and reinitialize the stringbuilder
       statementBlocks.Add(blockCollector.ToString();
       statementBlocks = new StringBuilder();
  }

}

//Tidy up
file.Close();

foreach(string statementBlock in statementBlocks)
{
  if(!String.IsNullOrEmpty(statementBlock))
  {
      if(statememtBlock.StartsWith("-->"))
      {
        //Code to split out the arguments; if they are delimited with : then you can just string.split this line
        //string[] paramsAndValues = line.Replace("-->", String.Empty).Split(Char.Parse(":"))
        // then for each string in here it's paramName(DataType)=Value, which is also splittable.
      }
      else
      {
      //Do whatever you want with this valid block (including writing it to another file!)
      //To keep only the unique ones, store each block in a list, then look to see if a block already exists in the list each time; if it does, just skip this block. Given you also know that the next block will be a parameter block, you can also collect the parameters here too
      }
  }    
}

I can't check this compiles right now but it should give you a general sense of a possible way to do what you want.

It makes the assumption that the only empty lines are the ones between statement blocks.

share|improve this answer
    
Cool; I'm thinking replacing the List<String> with a HashSet<String> might obviate the need to explicitly look for redundant entries. – B. Clay Shannon Jun 20 '12 at 22:02
    
@ClayShannon I'd definitely take a look at Jon's answer; his is a more complete solution. Collecting it in a dictionary is possible if the sql is consistent and is a simple way to associate the corresponding arguments. It's how I'd approach the second part of your problem. Had fun with this question, hence the +1, although some may find it a bit too localized. – dash Jun 20 '12 at 22:06

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