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count the occurrences of each symbol and the location they appear in the text, word or line I have a list of words like so in many languages.

What I am trying to do it count the occurrences of each character and the position in the text where they are, or are common. also if it's possible to count the common number of syllables that would also be helpful.

sommige
disa
بَعْض - ba'th
mi qani - մի քանի
bəzi
batzuk
nyeykі/nyeykaya/nyeykaye/nyeykіya - нейкі/нейкая/нейкае/нейкія
kisu - কিসু
afouhe - بعض
neki
alguns
njakoj - някой
一些
algú/alguns/alguna/algunes
neki
někteří
nogle
berekhey āz - برخی از
een paar
kam - كام
some
iuj
mõned
berekhey āz - برخی از
ilan
joitakin
sommige
certains
algúns
ramdenime - რამდენიმე
einige
peripou - περίπου
keṭelāk - કેટલાક 
wasu
kèk
khemeh - כמה
kuch - कुछ
néhány
sumir
beberapa
roinnt
alcuni
ikutsu ka no - いくつかの
kelavu
មួយចំនួន
조금 - jo geum
هەندێک
aliquis
daži
keli
nekoi - некои
misy
beberapa
ഏതാനും
xi
yī xiē  - 一些
kaahi - कांही
neki
shwiya - بعض
kehi - केही
enkelte
gari
berekhey āz - برخی از
b'eda - بعضی
kilka
ਕਈ
alguns
câţiva/câteva
некоторые - nekotorыe

some
neki - неки
samahara - සමහර
niektorí
nekaj
algunos
baadhi
några
ilan
yakchand - якчанд
konjam - கொஞ்சம்
yan
konni - కొన్ని
บาง - baang
bazı
dejakі - деякі
chened - چند
ba'zi, qandaydir
một số
rhai
עטלעכע
die
okumbalwa

this is the current code sehe made it work with unicode

//#define PREFER_BOOST
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
#include <map>
#include <istream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>
#ifdef PREFER_BOOST
#include <boost/locale.hpp>
#endif

using namespace std;

std::map<wchar_t, int> letterCount;
struct Counter
{
    void operator()(wchar_t  item) 
    { 
        if ( !std::isspace(item) )
            ++letterCount[std::tolower(item)]; //remove tolower if you want case-sensitive solution!
    }
};

int main()
{
    std::setlocale(LC_ALL, "en_US.UTF-8");
    wifstream input("input.txt");

#ifdef PREFER_BOOST 
    boost::locale::generator gen;
    std::locale loc = gen("en_US.UTF-8"); 
#else
    std::locale loc("en_US.UTF-8");
#endif
    input.imbue(loc);
    wcout.imbue(loc);

    istreambuf_iterator<wchar_t> start(input), end;
    std::for_each(start, end, Counter());

    for (std::map<wchar_t, int>::iterator it = letterCount.begin(); it != letterCount.end(); ++it)
    {
        wcout << it->first <<" : "<< it->second << endl;
    }
}

this was my original code

 #include <iostream>
  #include <cctype>
 #include <fstream>
#include <string>
 #include <map>
  #include <istream>
   #include <vector>
 #include <list>
 #include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>


using namespace std;
 struct letter_only: std::ctype<char> 
 {
    letter_only(): std::ctype<char>(get_table()) {}

    static std::ctype_base::mask const* get_table()
    {
       static std::vector<std::ctype_base::mask> 
             rc(std::ctype<char>::table_size,std::ctype_base::space);

       std::fill(&rc['A'], &rc['z'+1], std::ctype_base::alpha);
       return &rc[0];
    }
 };

struct Counter
{
    std::map<char, int> letterCount;
    void operator()(char  item) 
    { 
       if ( item != std::ctype_base::space)
         ++letterCount[tolower(item)]; //remove tolower if you want case-sensitive solution!
    }
    operator std::map<char, int>() { return letterCount ; }
};

int main()
{
     ifstream input;
     input.imbue(std::locale(std::locale(), new letter_only())); //enable reading only leters only!
     input.open("T");
     istream_iterator<char> start(input);
     istream_iterator<char> end;
     std::map<char, int> letterCount = std::for_each(start, end, Counter());
     for (std::map<char, int>::iterator it = letterCount.begin(); it != letterCount.end(); ++it)
     {
          cout << it->first <<" : "<< it->second << endl;
     }
 }

Example of what I am trying to get as out put

к : 10 (2,5) (1,5,8) (2,7) (1,3,5)

the letter that is found K then the number of occurrences it was found 10 then the locations in each word where it was found as mentioned before.

share|improve this question
3  
What does your current code do? What is it doing that you don't want it to do? What is not doing that you expect it to do? More details would help here. –  Justin Jun 20 '12 at 22:10
2  
You need UNICODE (std::wstring, wchar_t) –  kol Jun 20 '12 at 22:10
    
it currently display all a-z chars and there occurrences. I want it to give me there location in the word also though as in ana a:2 -- 1,3 like that. –  Taylor Bioniks Jun 20 '12 at 22:13
    
People, why is this being closed? It looks like a perfectly relevant question, with a fine SSCCE. I get the impression it is being closed because people don't know how to answer it? (I don't - but the answer sure interests me) –  sehe Jun 21 '12 at 6:44
    
@kol: actually you would probably need UTF32 (std::u32string if you dont want to depend on wchar_t size), since ctype does not support surrogate pairs. Of course std::wstring would be ok if wchar_t is at least 32bits wide. –  smerlin Jun 21 '12 at 8:11
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's what I got, and it seems to works quite well on my machine1.

//#define PREFER_BOOST
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
#include <map>
#include <istream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>
#ifdef PREFER_BOOST
#include <boost/locale.hpp>
#endif

using namespace std;

std::map<wchar_t, int> letterCount;
struct Counter
{
    void operator()(wchar_t  item) 
    { 
        if ( !std::isspace(item) )
            ++letterCount[std::tolower(item)]; //remove tolower if you want case-sensitive solution!
    }
};

int main()
{
    std::setlocale(LC_ALL, "en_US.UTF-8");
    wifstream input("input.txt");

#ifdef PREFER_BOOST 
    boost::locale::generator gen;
    std::locale loc = gen("en_US.UTF-8"); 
#else
    std::locale loc("en_US.UTF-8");
#endif
    input.imbue(loc);
    wcout.imbue(loc);

    istreambuf_iterator<wchar_t> start(input), end;
    std::for_each(start, end, Counter());

    for (std::map<wchar_t, int>::iterator it = letterCount.begin(); it != letterCount.end(); ++it)
    {
        wcout << it->first <<" : "<< it->second << endl;
    }
}

If you prefer the boost locale library, you need to link to boost_system, boost_locale and boost_thread; I didn't see any noticeable difference in behaviour

Output:

' : 3 , : 1 - : 32 / : 10 a : 67 b : 16 c : 7
d : 12 e : 61 f : 1 g : 16 h : 17 i : 46 j : 8
k : 41 l : 19 m : 19 n : 47 o : 20 p : 5 q : 3
r : 18 s : 21 t : 12 u : 21 v : 3 w : 3 x : 2
y : 21 z : 7 á : 1 â : 2 å : 1 è : 1 é : 1
í : 2 õ : 1 ú : 2 ā : 4 ē : 1 ě : 1 ī : 1
ı : 1 ř : 1 ţ : 1 ž : 1 ə : 1 ί : 1 ε : 1
ο : 1 π : 2 ρ : 1 υ : 1 а : 3 д : 2 е : 10
и : 2 й : 5 к : 10 н : 9 о : 4 р : 1 т : 1
ч : 1 ы : 2 я : 5 і : 6 ա : 1 ի : 2 մ : 1
ն : 1 ք : 1 ה : 1 ט : 1 כ : 2 ל : 1 מ : 1
ע : 3 ا : 4 ب : 7 خ : 3 د : 2 ر : 3 ز : 3
ض : 4 ع : 4 ك : 1 م : 1 ن : 2 ه : 1 َ : 1
 : 1 چ : 1 ک : 1 ی : 4 ێ : 1 ە : 1 ं : 1
ी : 2 ु : 1 े : 1 ক : 1 ি : 1 ু : 1 ਕ : 1
ક : 2 ટ : 1 ે : 1 க : 1 ் : 2 క : 1 ి : 1
 : 1 ഏ : 1 ു : 1 ර : 1 ස : 1 ง : 1 า : 1
ა : 1 დ : 1 ე : 2 ი : 1 მ : 2 ნ : 1 რ : 1
ច : 1 ន : 2 ម : 1 យ : 1 ួ : 2 ំ : 1 ố : 1
ộ : 1 い : 1 か : 1 く : 1 の : 1 一 : 2 些 : 2
금 : 1

1. I might not get all characters displayed, but it might be due to my terminal font.

share|improve this answer
1  
std::ctype and functions like std::tolower dont support surrogate pairs, so wchar_t has to be at least 32 bits wide for this to work. –  smerlin Jun 21 '12 at 8:12
1  
@sehe: Yeah, libICU is a good solution until char32_t is supported properly by all compilers. If you are using GCC using wchar_t should be fine. Maybe that also works on Windows with MinGW. –  smerlin Jun 21 '12 at 9:02
1  
That looks a lot like the working of standard UNIX utility ptx. Brb –  sehe Jun 21 '12 at 15:08
1  
Yes, ptx -W . -S .. input.txt gets you a little ways, but sadly, ptx assumes latin1 (iso-8859-1) charset. Ah well. –  sehe Jun 21 '12 at 15:15
1  
Anyways, I might have a look at your new specs later. Why don't you edit the question to reflect this goal? Your code certainly doesn't do this, and the text description by no means mention what you are asking now. –  sehe Jun 21 '12 at 15:16
show 6 more comments

Here is what I got it to do, with the help of all the others, thank you.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
#include <map>
#include <istream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>
#include <sstream>
using namespace std;

struct op {
    int O;
    wstring P;
};

template <typename T>
wstring NumberToString ( T Number )
{
    wstringstream ss;
    ss << Number;
    ss<<",";
    return ss.str();
}

std::map<wchar_t, struct op> letterCount;
void Counter(wchar_t  item) {
    if ( !std::isspace(item) ) {
        ++letterCount[std::tolower(item)].O;    //remove tolower if you want case-sensitive solution!
    }
}

int main()
{
    wchar_t * cline;
    wstring line;
    wchar_t const* B = L"(";
    wchar_t const* E = L")";
    std::setlocale(LC_ALL, "en_US.UTF-8");
    wifstream input("T");
    std::locale loc("en_US.UTF-8");
    input.imbue(loc);
    wcout.imbue(loc);

    if (input.is_open()) {
        while ( !input.eof() ) {
            wstring check;
            getline (input,line);
            wcout << line << endl;
            cline = new wchar_t [line.size()+1];
            wcscpy (cline, line.c_str());

            for (int i = 0; i  < line.size()+1; ++i) {
                Counter(cline[i]);
                if(check.find(cline[i]) == string::npos)
                    for (int j=0; j<line.size()+1; j++) {
                        if (j == 0) {
                            letterCount[std::tolower(cline[i])].P+= B;
                        }
                        if (j == line.size()) {
                            letterCount[std::tolower(cline[i])].P+= E;
                        }
                        if(cline[i]==cline[j]) {
                            letterCount[std::tolower(cline[i])].P+= NumberToString(j) ;
                            check +=cline[i];
                        }
                    }
            }
        }
        input.close();
    }

    for (std::map<wchar_t, struct op>::iterator it = letterCount.begin(); it != letterCount.end(); ++it) {
        wcout << it->first <<" : "<< it->second.O << "@" << it->second.P<< endl;
    }
}

output:

н : 9@(36,42,49,56,)(9,)(8,)(0,)(7,)(15,)
о : 4@(12,)(11,)(3,5,)
р : 1@(6,)
т : 1@(4,)
ч : 1@(13,)
ы : 2@(7,19,)
я : 5@(47,61,)(10,)(11,)(11,)
і : 6@(5,30,40,60,)(5,13,)
ա : 1@(14,)
ի : 2@(11,16,)
մ : 1@(10,)
ն : 1@(15,)
ք : 1@(13,)
share|improve this answer
    
looks kinda neat. given time, I'll see what I can learn from this –  sehe Jun 24 '12 at 22:10
add comment
#include <iostream>
#include <stdio>
#include <conio>

main()
{
 char name[1000],temp[1000];
 int i,j,n,present,count=0;
 clrscr();
 cout<<"Enter your char length:-";
 cin>>n;
 cout<<"\nEnter your text below:-\n\n";

 //get the text
 for(i=0;i<n;i++)
 {
  name[i]=getchar();
  temp[i]='\0';        //clear temp array
 }

 //extracting unique characters to temp[]
 temp[0]=name[0];
 for(i=1;i<n;i++)
 {
    present=0;
    for(j=0;j<strlen(temp);j++)
    {
      if(name[i]==temp[j])
      {
        present=1;
        break;
      }
    }
    if(present==0)
    {
     count++;
     temp[count]=name[i];
    }

 }

//counting char occurance
for (i=0;i<strlen(temp); i++)
{
   int count=0;
   cout<<"\n(";
   for (int j=0;j<n; j++)
   {
      if(temp[i]==name[j])
      {
        count++;
        cout<<j<<",";
      }
   }
   cout<<")\t\t"<<temp[i]<<":"<<count;
}
getch();
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

You should investigate Huffman coding: NIST on Huffman Coding

That way you will not only get all occurrences of a letter, but also common number of syllables (if i understand correctly what is meant by that).

The Huffman algorithm is typically used for compression and search trees, but it will solve your problem in drive by (as this is exactly what Huffman does).

There is already a C++ implementation of that available on Codeproject: Huffman in C++ You will only need a part of it, as you are probably not interested in compression.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't see what this has to do with it. Unless you demonstrate how it solves the question, perhaps this should have been nothing more than the comment it currently is. In case it isn't obvious, the treatment of Unicode code points is the complicating factor to this question. –  sehe Jun 21 '12 at 8:36
    
Huffman coding is a perfect solution of this setting. what exactly do you not understand about how huffman works and how this problem is solved with it? Huffman works perfectly on unicode code points, as well as on ASCII. –  Mare Infinitus Jun 21 '12 at 8:47
    
I honestly think the question is more on the coding level (as this is a SO question, and the code shown clearly has elementary problems in that area). If you feel that Huffman is nice to create histograms of syllables, well, you may be right (allthough I think the absense of a valid definition of syllable cripples it somewhat). –  sehe Jun 21 '12 at 8:56
    
Huffman cannot understand languages. it just can say: "s" occurs 20 times, "st" occurs 12 times, "sta" occurs 4 times, "star" occurs 2 times... and so on. This seems to me what the author wants, but as long as he does not answer, i cannot tell either –  Mare Infinitus Jun 21 '12 at 9:23
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