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I want to make a WCF timer service where clients can register in order to get called back from the service after a certain time has passed. The problem is that the client doesn't get called back. No Exception is thrown.

The callback interface is:

[ServiceContract]
public interface ITimerCallbackTarget
{
  [OperationContract(IsOneWay = true)]
  void OnTimeElapsed(int someInfo);
}

The service looks like:

[ServiceBehavior(InstanceContextMode = InstanceContextMode.Single,
  ConcurrencyMode = ConcurrencyMode.Single)]  
public class TimerService : ITimerService
   private readonly Timer _timer = new Timer(2000); //System.Timers.Timer

   public void Subscribe()
   {
     ITimerCallbackTarget listener = 
       OperationContext.Current.GetCallbackChannel<ITimerCallbackTarget>();

     _timer.Elapsed += (p1, p2) =>
     {
       listener.OnTimeElapsed(999);
      };
     _timer.Start();
   }

The callback method used by the client is:

private class TimerCallbackTarget : ITimerCallbackTarget
{
  public void OnTimeElapsed(int someInfo)
  {
    Console.WriteLine(someInfo);
  }
}

The client registers like this:

private static void TestTimerService()
{
  InstanceContext callbackInstance = new InstanceContext(new TimerCallbackTarget());

  using (DuplexChannelFactory<ITimerService> dcf =
    new DuplexChannelFactory<ITimerService>(callbackInstance,  
      "TimerService_SecureTcpEndpoint"))
  {
    ITimerService timerProxy = dcf.CreateChannel();

    timerProxy.Subscribe();        
  }
}

If I use a different thread at the subscribe method without Timer it works:

  ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(p =>
  {
    listener.OnTimeElapsed(999);
  });

It even works with the Timer (for three seconds) if I put a Thread.Sleep(3000) at the end of the subscribe method so my guess is that maybe the channel to the callback-object gets closed after the subscribe method is finished. Using a class-scope variable for the callback object retrieved with OperationContext.Current.GetCallbackChannel(); instead of the method-scope variable didn't help.

Previously i tried creating new Threads in the elapsed event handler of the Timer of the timer service to make it faster. An ObjectDisposedException was thrown with the message: "Cannot access a disposed object. Object name: 'System.ServiceModel.Channels.ServiceChannel". I then tried to simplify my service and found that even using only the Timer causes problems as described but I guess the exception indicates that somewhere the connection to the client's callback object is lost. It's strange that there is no excepiton if I don't make new threads in the Timer thread. The callback method just isn't called.

share|improve this question
    
You may need to set IsOneWay = false as it is a duplex system and not fire-and-forget. –  oleksii Jun 20 '12 at 22:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In a duplex binding the lifetime of the two channels are linked. If the channel to the TimerService closes, then the callback channel to the CallbackTarget closes too. If you try to use a channel that was closed, you can get an ObjectDisposedExcpetion. In your case this is bad, because you don't want to keep the Subscribe() channel open just to receive OnTimeElasped() calls... and I'm assuming you want to subscribe for an infinitely long time.

A duplex channel is trying to make your life easier, but doesn't fit your needs. Behind the scenes a duplex channel is actually creating a second WCF service host for the CallbackTarget. If you create the client's service host manually to receive callbacks, then you can manage its lifetime independently of the Subscribe() channel.

Below is a fully functional command line program that demonstrates the idea:

  1. Create a TimerService
  2. Create a TimerClient to receive notificatioins
  3. Pass the TimerClient's endpoint address to the TimerService as a part of the subscribe call
  4. TimerService uses the address it got from Subscribe() to send notifications to the TimerClient.

Note that no channel is left open longer than needed to make a single call.

Standard disclaimer: This is intended to show how to create "duplex like" behavior. There's a lack of error handling and other short cuts.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.ServiceModel;
using System.Timers;
using System.ServiceModel.Description;

namespace WcfConsoleApplication
{
    [ServiceContract]
    public interface ITimerCallbackTarget
    {
        [OperationContract(IsOneWay = true)]
        void OnTimeElapsed(int someInfo);
    } 

    [ServiceContract]
    public interface ITimerService
    {
        [OperationContract(IsOneWay = true)]
        void Subscribe(string address);
    }


    [ServiceBehavior(InstanceContextMode = InstanceContextMode.Single,
                     ConcurrencyMode = ConcurrencyMode.Single)]
    public class TimerService : ITimerService
    {
        private readonly Timer _timer = new Timer(2000);
        private ChannelFactory<ITimerCallbackTarget> _channelFac;
        private int _dataToSend = 99;

        public void Subscribe(string address)
        {
            // note: You can also load a configured endpoint by name from app.config here,
            //       and still change the address at runtime in code.
            _channelFac = new ChannelFactory<ITimerCallbackTarget>(new BasicHttpBinding(), address);

            _timer.Elapsed += (p1, p2) =>
            {
                ITimerCallbackTarget callback = _channelFac.CreateChannel();
                callback.OnTimeElapsed(_dataToSend++);

                ((ICommunicationObject)callback).Close();

                // By not keeping the channel open any longer than needed to make a single call
                // there's no risk of timeouts, disposed objects, etc.
                // Caching the channel factory is not required, but gives a measurable performance gain.
            };
            _timer.Start();
        }
    }

    [ServiceBehavior(InstanceContextMode = InstanceContextMode.Single,
                     ConcurrencyMode = ConcurrencyMode.Single)]
    public class TimerClient : ITimerCallbackTarget
    {
        public void OnTimeElapsed(int someInfo)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Got Info: " + someInfo);
        }
    }


    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {

            ServiceHost hostTimerService = new ServiceHost(typeof(TimerService), new Uri("http://localhost:8080/TimerService"));
            ServiceHost hostTimerClient = new ServiceHost(typeof(TimerClient), new Uri("http://localhost:8080/TimerClient"));
            ChannelFactory<ITimerService> proxyFactory = null;

            try
            {
                // start the services
                hostTimerService.Open();
                hostTimerClient.Open();

                // subscribe to ITimerService
                proxyFactory = new ChannelFactory<ITimerService>(new BasicHttpBinding(), "http://localhost:8080/TimerService");
                ITimerService timerService = proxyFactory.CreateChannel();
                timerService.Subscribe("http://localhost:8080/TimerClient");
                ((ICommunicationObject)timerService).Close();

                // wait for call backs...
                Console.WriteLine("Wait for Elapsed updates. Press enter to exit.");
                Console.ReadLine();
            }
            finally
            {
                hostTimerService.Close();
                hostTimerClient.Close();
                proxyFactory.Close();
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for that detailed answer. It works. The only problem now is than when I use a ThreadPool thread in the elapsed handler of the service in order to do the callback there is a ServerTooBusyException (only if I abort the client during execution) but I guess that's a different sory. –  user764754 Jun 22 '12 at 11:16
    
When you shutdown the client it should do an unsubscribe so the service stops calling. If the service handler is calling a client that isn't there, some kind of exception is the right behavior... and the better question is why don't you see an exception when you use the timer. –  ErnieL Jun 22 '12 at 13:54
1  
The timer documentation says "In the .NET Framework version 2.0 and earlier, the Timer component catches and suppresses all exceptions thrown by event handlers for the Elapsed event." I'm not seeing any mention of a change in .NET 4.0. Could this be your issue? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.timers.timer.aspx –  ErnieL Jun 22 '12 at 18:41
    
Nice info, thanks. It explains the different behaviors (no server crash with Timer). So if I want to make the server more robust (against unexpected client "disappearance") I could catch the ServerTooBusyException like the Timer probably implicitly does. –  user764754 Jun 22 '12 at 19:18

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