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Other than as a modulus operator, what does the percent sign do in PHP?

For instance, I am looking at some PHP code, and see the following:

define('TABLE_PREFIX','%CONFIG-PREFIX');

Elsewhere, in a SQL file, I see the following. I expect the SQL script is being parsed by PHP.

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS `%TABLE_PREFIX%api_key`;

Thank you

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I don't think it does anything special in the string. Maybe the library you're using modifies it somehow? –  minitech Jun 20 '12 at 23:43
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as to sql its usually a wild card "% Matches any number of characters, even zero characters" but this case its something 'custom" –  Dagon Jun 20 '12 at 23:44
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

PHP doesn't intrinsically treat it specially within strings. It must be the application that's parsing the strings and deciding that % indicates some kind of variable value.

In fact, it looks like you're looking at the source code of a project called osTicket. In its installer, I found this line which corresponds to your given define:

$configfile= str_replace('%CONFIG-PREFIX',$_POST['prefix'],$configfile);
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Your right about osticket. I had also found the below script listed under nickb's post. Thanks! –  user1032531 Jun 21 '12 at 0:04
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In PHP, nothing. Somewhere in whatever database driver you're using, the driver is parsing that string to put the prefix in, most likely with something similar to:

$sql = str_replace( '%TABLE_PREFIX%', TABLE_PREFIX, $sql);
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Found it. Thanks! function replace_table_prefix($query) { return str_replace('%TABLE_PREFIX%',PREFIX, $query); } –  user1032531 Jun 20 '12 at 23:48
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