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I have a 2 dimensional array. When I print/Dump this I get the following

My 2 dim array:

push (@matrix, \@a1Comparea2);
push (@matrix, \@a3Comparea4);

a1Comparea2 should be first row of array a3Comparea4 should be second row of array

$VAR1 = [
          [
            '1 6',
            '2 7',
            '3 8',
            '4 9',
            '5 10'
          ],
          $VAR1->[0],
          $VAR1->[0],
          $VAR1->[0],
          $VAR1->[0],
          [
            '7 12',
            '8 13',
            '9 14',
            '10 15',
            '11 16'
          ],
          $VAR1->[5],
          $VAR1->[5],
          $VAR1->[5],
          $VAR1->[5]
        ];

When I try to print this with following code:

for (my $j= 0; $j < $rows; $j++)
{
        for (my $k= 0; $k < @a1; $k++)
        {
                print "Row:$j Col:$k = $matrix[$j][$k]\n";
        }
}

I get the following output:

Row:0 Col:0 = 1 6
Row:0 Col:1 = 2 7
Row:0 Col:2 = 3 8
Row:0 Col:3 = 4 9
Row:0 Col:4 = 5 10
Row:1 Col:0 = 1 6
Row:1 Col:1 = 2 7
Row:1 Col:2 = 3 8
Row:1 Col:3 = 4 9
Row:1 Col:4 = 5 10

As you can see the data is duplicated.

share|improve this question
    
The elements in the matrix that reads "$VAR->[0]" and $VAR->[5] is Data::Dumper's way of saying there are multiple copies of the same thing in your data structure. If you post more initialiazing code it might help. How is a1Comparea2 defined? –  Knut Haugen Jul 11 '09 at 5:28
    
so I did some digging around. My matrix is being formed by pusshing array references into it. Data is duplicated if arrays are pushed sequentially in a loop. but if i declare @matrix = (\@array1, \@array2) then everything is fine. know why that might be? –  Aaron Jul 11 '09 at 6:16
    
Show us your loop. –  dave4420 Jul 11 '09 at 7:54
    
@ Rob: post the code that creates the array. Then someone should be able to help you. You should also look at two tutorials in Perl's internal documentation: perldoc perllol and perldoc perldsc. They are online as well: perldoc.perl.org/perllol.html and perldoc.perl.org/perldsc.html –  Telemachus Jul 11 '09 at 11:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Is you array correctly defined?
You use an @ for array and a $ for scalar...
Check this article for a quick reference.


That article gives this simple example.

@matrix = (
        [3, 4, 10],
        [2, 7, 12],
        [0, 3, 4],
        [6, 5, 9],
      );

This creates an array with four rows and three columns. To print the elements of the array, type:

for($row = 0; $row < 4; $row++) {
    for($col = 0; $col < 3; $col++) {
        print "$matrix[$row][$col] ";
   }
   print "\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think as the dump shows, my matrix is defined correctly. I've updated the question to show how my matrix is defined. –  Aaron Jul 11 '09 at 5:13
    
You've left something out. You add two array refs, but your dump clearly shows more than that. –  Bill Jul 11 '09 at 5:48
    
@Bill, I presume you are addressing rob who wrote the question. –  nik Jul 11 '09 at 6:03

Are you sure you used the code you showed above? Maybe you used something like:

for (my $j= 0; $j < $rows; $j++)
{
        for (my $k= 0; $k < @a1; $k++)
        {
                print "Row:$j Col:$k = $matrix[$not_j][$k]\n";
        }
}

$not_j would evaluate always to 0, producing your output.

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