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this is my first post here and I have a question that seems really nooby, but this has been troubling me for the past hour or so.

I'm making a simple JFrame with a JPanel in it, but the Windows 7 border frame appears to be blocking my view of parts of the panel. For instance, if I draw a little square at coordinate 0,0, it will not appear and I suspect it's behind the window frame.

I've tried messing around with pack, setsize, setpreferred size, setresizable, and different layouts, but I can't get it to show the top 20 pixels or so!

This is what I have:

public RedSunGame() {
super("Red Sun");

rs = new JPanel(new BorderLayout(), true);
rs.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(WIDTH, HEIGHT));
add(rs, "Center");

setPreferredSize(new Dimension(WIDTH, HEIGHT));
pack();
setResizable(false);
setDefaultCloseOperation(EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
setVisible(true);
}

EDIT:

Thanks for all of your replies, sorry for the lack of info :)

I'm using a double buffer strategy I saw in a book. gameRender and paintScreen are in a standard game loop. My RedSunGame class extends JFrame. All the relevant code you could ask for in addition to above:

private static final int WIDTH = 500;
private static final int HEIGHT = 500;
private JPanel rs;
private Graphics2D g2d;
private Image dbImage;

private void gameRender() {
//create buffer
if (dbImage == null){
  dbImage = createImage(WIDTH, HEIGHT);
  g2d = (Graphics2D)dbImage.getGraphics();
}
//clear screen
g2d.setColor(Color.white);
g2d.fillRect(0, 0, WIDTH, HEIGHT);

g2d.setColor(Color.blue);
g2d.setFont(font);
g2d.drawString("FPS: " + FPS, 0, HEIGHT);
g2d.fillRect(30, 30, 10, 10);
}

private void paintScreen() {
Graphics g;
try {
  g = getGraphics();
  if ((g != null) && (dbImage != null))
    g.drawImage(dbImage, 0, 0, null);
  Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().sync();
  g.dispose();
}
catch (Exception e)
{ System.out.println("Graphics context error: " + e);  }
}

With my current settings it looks like this. http://i.imgur.com/qaabC.png

This is what happens if I have g2d.fillRect(30, 30, 10, 10), the only change being the coordinates 30,30 instead of 0,0. It's definitely hiding behind the border up top. http://i.imgur.com/uzfFe.png

Also, setting it to BorderLayout.CENTER doesn't seem to make a difference in any of these cases.

(sorry it won't let new users post images)

EDIT: I figured it out. I was drawing directly to the JFrame. @Guillaume Polet I see why you shouldn't override the paint method of JFrames as it draws to the frame and not the panel that should actually display content!! Thanks

share|improve this question
    
A screenshot will explain much clearer than words... –  Thihara Jun 21 '12 at 5:06
    
The code that you posted does not show where you draw your little square. –  Guillaume Polet Jun 21 '12 at 6:26
    
Just a suggestion, never try to use setXxXSize(...) methods, since many a Layout Managers don't respect user defined size values. Let the concerned Layout Manager take care of how the size of the component. Simply adding the component to the CENTER of the BorderLayout will do the trick for your case, as described in every answer :-) –  nIcE cOw Jun 21 '12 at 6:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here is a sample code that shows how your goal can be achieved. Try to spot the differences with your code to find what is wrong:

import java.awt.BorderLayout;
import java.awt.Color;
import java.awt.Dimension;
import java.awt.Graphics;

import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JPanel;
import javax.swing.SwingUtilities;

public class RedSunGame {

    private static final int SQUARE_SIZE = 20;
    private JPanel rs;
    private JFrame frame;

    private void initUI() {
        frame = new JFrame("Red Sun");
        frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        rs = new JPanel(new BorderLayout()) {
            @Override
            protected void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
                super.paintComponent(g);
                g.setColor(Color.YELLOW);
                g.fillRect(0, 0, SQUARE_SIZE, SQUARE_SIZE);
            }

            @Override
            public Dimension getPreferredSize() {
                Dimension preferredSize = super.getPreferredSize();
                // Let's make sure that we have at least our little square size.
                preferredSize.width = Math.max(preferredSize.width, SQUARE_SIZE);
                preferredSize.height = Math.max(preferredSize.height, SQUARE_SIZE);
                return preferredSize;
            }
        };
        frame.add(rs);
        frame.pack();
        frame.setVisible(true);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                RedSunGame redSunGame = new RedSunGame();
                redSunGame.initUI();
            }
        });
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
If I override paintComponent in my code like you did, it works and draws a yellow square in the corner, but for some reason it doesn't work with the buffer that I've created. Any ideas? –  Mike Jun 21 '12 at 8:15
    
There are many problems with your code. I don't know if you override the paint method of the JFrame, but if you do: don't! ;-), do that on the ContentPane or other child components. Now, for your code, you should almost never call getGraphics nor should you ever hold a reference to a Graphics. Either you use the one provided as a parameter of the paintXXX() methods, or you create your own (for example on BufferedImage, you can call createGraphics, paint and then dispose the graphics). As for double-buffering, it is enabled by default in Swing, so don't do it yourself a second time. –  Guillaume Polet Jun 21 '12 at 8:30
    
+1 for overriding getPreferredSize(). –  trashgod Jun 21 '12 at 16:30

Verify that WIDTH and HEIGHT are > 0.

Try this:

//add(rs, "center");
add(rs, BorderLayout.CENTER);
share|improve this answer

you may got your answer but for a newbie to java swing i suggest that you should the Net-beans IDE. it graphically adds and lays out the GUI and you dont need to write any hand-written code. It's a great place to start, as stated here:

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/uiswing/learn/index.html

share|improve this answer
1  
I would recommend the exact opposite: first master Swing "manually", then use GUI-builders when you know what you are doing. Many questions that arises on SO are related to people using a GUI-builder and not understanding at all what Swing is doing. –  Guillaume Polet Jun 21 '12 at 8:32

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