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Suppose I have a matrix of weights, and another matrix of data values. Can I multiply or divide one matrix by the other such that each element in one matrix is multiplied/divided only by the corresponding element in the other matrix, without having to loop through every position?

I feel ridiculous asking this question but I can't seem to find the answer via google.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

a .* b to multiply the matrices pointwise.

a ./ b to divide.

Like this:

octave:1> a = [1 2; 3 4];
octave:2> b = [3 4; 5 6];
octave:3> a .* b
ans =

    3    8
   15   24

octave:4> a ./ b
ans =

   0.33333   0.50000
   0.60000   0.66667

For an arbitrary binary function, use bsxfun:

in octave

in matlab

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thank you very much! –  mavix Jun 21 '12 at 5:55
    
hey, I have another question: suppose I want to multiply each column of a matrix by a corresponding scalar from a vector? Like if in your example I just wanted to multiply the first column of a by b_11 and the second column by b_12 –  mavix Jun 21 '12 at 6:14
1  
    
its called matrix dot-multiplication. Google it out first. –  magarwal Jun 21 '12 at 8:44
    
@mavix: bsxun(@times, a, b) for multiplication (replace with @rdivide for division) –  Amro Jun 21 '12 at 9:03

A = [1 2 3]; B = [ 1 1 1; 2 2 2; 3 3 3];

C = repmat(A', 1,3) ans = C *. B

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You want to use elementwise multiplication or division. To use elementwise multiplication (as opposed to matrix multiplication), put a period in front as such:

A .* B

Here is a tutorial on linear algebra with Octave (goes into a bit more depth): http://www.lauradhamilton.com/tutorial-linear-algebra-with-octave

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