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I have following code in C++

#include <iostream>
#include <list>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;

class A{
  public:
    int x;
    int y;
    int first(){
      return x;
    }
    int second(){
      return y;
    }
};

class C{
  public:
    float a,b;
    C(){
      a = 0.0f;
      b = 0.0f;
    }
    template<class T>
      C(T t){
        cout<<"Copy Constructor\n";
        a = t.first();
        b = t.second();
      }
      template<class T>
    C & operator=(T const &c){
        cout <<"Assignment operator\n";
        this->a = c.first();
        this->b = c.first();
    }
};

class D: public C{
  public:
    template <typename T> D (T t) : C(t) {}
    float area(){
      return a*b; 
    }
};

int main(){
  A a;
  a.x = 6;
  a.y = 8;
  C c(a);
  D d(a);
  D e = a;   // Here copy constructor is being called!!
  cout<<e.a<<" "<<e.b<<" "<<e.area()<<endl;
}

Here is the output of the above program

Copy Constructor
Copy Constructor
Copy Constructor
6 8 48

Why is assignment operator not being called in derived class?

Edit1 : I have changed the question to make the question more clear.

share|improve this question
1  
Better get a good C++ introduction. The error messages are pretty clear - you are missing a ; after the closing brace of D, and the inheritance of copy constructors is noted in every chapter about inheritance. –  thiton Jun 21 '12 at 6:31
1  
The error is on this code D d(a);. It has nothing to do with the operator=. @thiton: Why are you talking about copy constructors? –  Jesse Good Jun 21 '12 at 6:32
    
Correction made. Put up the wrong code here. –  gibraltar Jun 21 '12 at 6:36

2 Answers 2

Constructors are not inherited as regular public functions. Default constructor are defined by the compiler if missing, but you should define a constructor taking an A parameter (or templated as you did for C) for D. You will need an assignment operator to be defined as well.

class D: public C{
  public:
    D(A aparam)
    : a(aparam.first(), b(aparam.second()){
    }
    D& operator=(const D& rhs){
      a = rhs.first();
      b = rhs.second();
    }
    float area(){
      return a*b; 
    }
};
share|improve this answer
1  
Indeed. Note D e = d invokes the copy constructor, not the copy assignment. –  Alexandre C. Jun 21 '12 at 6:35
    
@Alexandre: Thanks, actually both are needed –  Antonio Pérez Jun 21 '12 at 6:36
    
So if I already have a copy constructor then how do I create a copy operator? –  gibraltar Jun 21 '12 at 6:38
    
@gibraltar: there is no such a thing as a copy operator, you really should read something about C++ basics. –  Antonio Pérez Jun 21 '12 at 6:43
    
sorry I meant assignment operator. –  gibraltar Jun 21 '12 at 6:44

You can grab back said operator= explicitly using :

using C::operator=

in D class.

operator= are inherited but masked by default by th eone generated by th ecompiler.

share|improve this answer
    
You'll need to do something else in this case, since C::operator='s return type is C&, not D&. –  Antonio Pérez Jun 21 '12 at 7:07
    
if D inherits from C, then a D& is a C& and polymorphism will apply if needed. –  Joel Falcou Jun 21 '12 at 12:39
    
Polymorphism doesn't work to upcast classes, you have to specify a constructor or assignment operator for D taking a C parameter. See the error that gcc gives ideone.com/Y4bCj –  Antonio Pérez Jun 21 '12 at 13:20
    
your code demonstrates copy construction not assignment. This is the proper code : ideone.com/xIzg4 with the proper error. Now with using clause: ideone.com/DYGjL –  Joel Falcou Jun 21 '12 at 13:38
    
I just find it to be a bad smell that assignment operator on a D objet returns C&. But yes, your proposed solution works. –  Antonio Pérez Jun 21 '12 at 13:46

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