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Question:

An object of a parametrized class, when accessed from a sub-class is seen as a non-generic. How do I overcome this?

Details:

Consider a base class:

public class MyBaseClass {
    protected List<Number> numbers = new ArrayList<Number>();

    public MyBaseClass(){
        //...
    }
}

Now, let's extend this class:

public class MyDerivedClass extends MyBaseClass {

    public void addSomething() {
        numbers.add(25.0f); //Warning about type-safety here
    }
}

In the derived class, the numbers object is seen as a raw type. The warning is:

Type safety: The method add(Object) belongs to the raw type List. References to generic type List should be parameterized.

If I try to add the type parameter myself, I get a compile error:

        numbers.<Number>add(25.0f); //Error here

The error I see is:

The method add(Number) of type List is not generic; it cannot be parameterized with arguments

However, if I place both the classes in the same Java source file, then this problem goes away. There is no warning in the first place. This was a sample to illustrate the problem.

In my real application, I want to be able to get elements from the List in the derived class, and perform class-specific operations on them without having to first cast the retrieved object to the appropriate type.

I suspect the problem is because of type erasure, but I cannot figure out how to work around it.


EDIT:

I'm using Eclipse 3.7.2 and Oracle JDK 1.6.0_30 on Fedora Core 16. The compiler compliance is set to 1.6 with default compliance settings. As I mentioned, if I place both classes in the same .java file, then I don't see the warning. It is seen only if I place them in different files.

I can work around this by defining all methods that directly operate on the list object in the parent class; and using this from the derived class.

But I'm still curious as to why I see the warning. Here's the work-around:

In MyBaseClass:

    protected void addNumberToList(Number num){
        numbers.add(num);
    }

and then in derived class:

    public void addSomething() {
        addNumberToList(25.0f);
    }

Similarly, all operations that manipulate the List object directly can be in the base class.

share|improve this question
    
Which compiler, mine doesn't behave like that? –  dacwe Jun 21 '12 at 7:17
    
Same here I tried it and for me no warning. –  Subin Jun 21 '12 at 7:19
    
No warning here too –  Francisco Spaeth Jun 21 '12 at 7:19
    
I'm puzzled, the above code compiles without errors or warning on my machine, as it should. I'm using JDK 7 Update 4. What compiler version are you using? –  alexraasch Jun 21 '12 at 7:26
    
This is really puzzling! I edited the question to add details about the compiler, compliance settings and other environment details. –  curioustechizen Jun 21 '12 at 7:30

2 Answers 2

Your real base class is generic, but your subclass inherits from its raw type:

public class MyBaseClass<X> {
    protected List<Number> numbers = new ArrayList<Number>();

    public List<Number> getNumbers() {
        return numbers;
    }
}

public class MyDerivedClass extends MyBaseClass {
    public void addSomething() {
        numbers.add(25.0f);
    }
}

JLS §4.8 says the member access will be treated as for raw types. That means numbers is treated as raw, hence the warning. The solution is to parameterize the supertypes:

public class MyDerivedClass extends MyBaseClass<TypeArgumentsHere>
share|improve this answer
    
Great answer. +1 for the reference to JLS Section 4.8. You pointed to the specs for SE7; I looked into the same for SE5 and its the same there. However, I don't see the warning if I place both the classes in the same file. Also, other answers and comments here on this question state that they don't see the warning. How would you explain that? –  curioustechizen Jun 21 '12 at 8:27
    
@curioustechizen The code you posted in your question is fine. It is type sound and warning-free. I suppose that most posters tried it and didn't see any warnings. If they were to try the code I posted, they would or at least should. –  Ben Schulz Jun 21 '12 at 9:47
    
I think there's a misunderstanding here. I am seeing the warnings with the code posted by me in the original question. This is what other posters have tried and reported to be working fine without warnings (as it should be according to your explanation). –  curioustechizen Jun 21 '12 at 10:02
    
@curioustechizen All I can tell you is that -- assuming a correct compiler and no byte code manipulation -- the only way to get that warning is if the supertype to which numbers belongs is raw. –  Ben Schulz Jun 21 '12 at 10:39

I use Eclipse and your code complied well with no warnings or errors. But I think you should provide protected/public method instead of exposing the instance variable.

public class MyBaseClass {
    protected List<Number> numbers = new ArrayList<Number>();

    public List<Number> getNumbers() {
        return numbers;
    }
}

public class MyDerivedClass extends MyBaseClass {

    public void addSomething() {
        getNumbers().add(25.0f);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I tried this too - same warning. –  curioustechizen Jun 21 '12 at 7:31

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