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When there's a collison during git merge, I open a mergetool called Meld. It opens three files LOCAL, BASE and REMOTE. As I've read LOCAL is my local branch, BASE is common ancestor and REMOTE is the branch to be merged.

Now to my question: which version of the file will be finally used? Is it REMOTE? If so, can I edit it as I want, regardless what's in the BASE branch for example?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 46 down vote accepted

It's the one in the middle : BASE.

In fact, BASE is not the common ancestor, but the half-finished merge where conflicts are marked with >>>> and <<<<.

You can see the file names on the top of meld editing window.

See the screenshot here

meld base

You can edit the BASE file as you want with or without using meld commands.
You can also get rid of meld and just edit the file with your favorite text editor.

  • The code between <<<< HEAD and ===== markers is the one of your local file before the merge.
  • The code between ==== and >>>> <branch name> is the one of the remote file.
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Some people get better understanding of the conflicting chunks in a file which failed automatic merging if they have the merge.conflictstyle configuration option set to diff3 instead of the default merge. –  kostix Jun 21 '12 at 22:48
2  
I actually don't see the HEAD, <<< and === sings. In the case you provided the middle window would be empty. But that's just a note for the others, thx for your answer. –  tsusanka Jun 22 '12 at 14:39
    
If you don't see the HEAD, <<<<< and ===== signs, it means that there is no conflict at all. In this case, the middle window will not be empty, it will show the merge result, but there will be no "red" part –  Fabien Quatravaux Jun 23 '12 at 17:03
6  
When I'm doing merges with Meld, I don't see any <<<<<<, ====== nor >>>>>> markers in the middle pane (i.e. the BASE version) either; and sometimes, the middle pane will be empty, like aGr reported. Maybe this difference is due to different settings. When I start the Meld tool, the following files will exist, assuming that the name of the file in the repository is X.java: X.java, X.java.orig, X.java.BACKUP.#, X.java.BASE.#, X.java.LOCAL.#, X.java.REMOTE.#, where # is some number. Calling the merge result the BASE version is confusing; MERGED would be better. –  Teemu Leisti Sep 24 '12 at 15:03
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Meld has a hidden 3-way merge feature activated by passing in the 4th parameter:

meld $LOCAL $BASE $REMOTE $MERGED

The right and left panes are opened in read-only mode, so you can't accidentally merge the wrong way around. The middle pane shows the result of merge. For the conflicts it shows the base version so that you can see all the important bits: original text in the middle, and conflicting modifications at both sides. Finally, when you press the "Save" button, the $MERGED file is written - exactly as expected by git.

The ~/.gitconfig file I use contains the following settings:

[merge]
tool = mymeld
conflictstyle = diff3
[mergetool "mymeld"]
cmd = meld --diff $BASE $LOCAL --diff $BASE $REMOTE --diff $LOCAL $BASE $REMOTE $MERGED

this opens meld with 3 tabs, 1st and 2nd tab containing the simple diffs I'm trying to merge, and the 3rd tab, open by default, shows the 3-way merge view.

Now, the reason the feature is hidden is that it's not polished enough yet. It's very useful as it is now, but Kai Willadsen, the meld author, pointed to few wrinkles that need ironing out. For example there's no GUI to start the 3-way merge mode, command line syntax is a bit arcane, and such. If you speak python and have some time on your hands - you know what to do.

Edit: In newer versions of Meld, the synax has changed slightly. This was in the comments, but it belongs in the answer.

The meld command now uses the --output option, so the last line from the snippet above should be:

cmd = meld --diff $BASE $LOCAL --diff $BASE $REMOTE --diff $LOCAL $BASE $REMOTE --output $MERGED
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That sounds useful. The default case of having the result of the merge called the "BASE" is confusing. –  Teemu Leisti Sep 24 '12 at 9:54
10  
I added this to my ~/.gitconfig and got meld: error: wrong number of arguments supplied to --diff :( Using meld 1.7.0. –  Jesse Jan 11 '13 at 2:57
    
I have a conflict where in one part of the file, the $LOCAL & $REMOTE (from upstream) are the same and the $BASE is showing old code (with green background) that’s been previously remove (including from the $LOCAL's origin). Where could it be getting this old code from? –  gnoll110 Jun 26 '13 at 1:13
4  
@Jesse, @lumbric, it appears that newer versions of meld use the flag --output for the $MERGED result. I discovered this while looking at the meld launch script that came with my version of git: github.com/git/git/blob/master/mergetools/meld –  Johann Feb 11 at 22:46
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@lumbric I believe it does, for Meld 1.7.x+ with the --output option. See this line in the launch script: "$merge_tool_path" --output "$MERGED" "$LOCAL" "$BASE" "$REMOTE" –  Johann Apr 7 at 16:03
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There are 4 files involved:

==================================================================================

1) $LOCAL=the file on the branch where you are merging; untouched by the merge process when shown to you

2) $REMOTE=the file on the branch from where you are merging; untouched by the merge process when shown to you

3) $BASE=the common ancestor of $LOCAL and $REMOTE, ie. the point where the two branches started diverting the considered file; untouched by the merge process when shown to you

4) $MERGED=the partially merged file, with conflicts; this is the only file touched by the merge process and, actually, never shown to you in meld

==================================================================================

The $MERGED file is the one that contains the <<<<<<, >>>>>>, ===== (and, maybe, ||||||) markers (that delimit conflicts). This is the file that you edit manually to correct conflicts.

The manual conflicts editing and the visual conflicts editing are done on different files and presented different informations.

When using the mergetool (assume meld), the files that are seeing therein are: $LOCAL, $BASE, $REMOTE. Note that you don't see the $MERGED file, although this is passed as a hidden parameter to meld to write the result of the edit there.

In other words, in meld, you are editing the file in the middle, the $BASE file, and you pick all the changes from left or from the right manually. It is a clean file, not touched by the merge process. The only glitch is that, when you save, you do not save into the $BASE file, but in the fourth hidden parameter of meld, that is the $MERGED file (that you do not even see). The $BASE file does not contain any conflicts or partial successful merges because it is not the $MERGED file.

In the visual editing, when presenting to you the $BASE file (instead of the $MERGED file) git basically discards all its attempts to do the merging (those attempts are visible, if you want, in the $MERGED file) and lets you to completely do the merging from scratch.

The bottom line is that in manual and visual merging conflicts you are not looking at the same files, but the final result is written in the same file (that is the $MERGED file).

The manual correction of the conflicts is done on $MERGED because git has no mean to present you three files, so it squashes the information from the three files ($LOCAL, $BASE, $REMOTE) in that $MERGED file.

But the visual tools have the means to show you three files: they show you the $LOCAL, $BASE, $REMOTE files. You are picking changes from the $LOCAL and $REMOTE files and you are bringing those into the $BASE file, completely re-building and even overwriting the failed attempt of merging that is the $MERGED file.

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I just wanted that there are tools (e.g. beyond compare) that do show all 4 files –  yoniLavi Dec 30 '13 at 15:14
    
@yoniYalovitsky: yes, or p4merge –  axeoth Dec 31 '13 at 7:42
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I found that none of the default files shown was being saved. meld was showing $LOCAL, $REMOTE and $BASE by default. To make it work, I needed to make meld show $MERGED instead of $BASE. Putting this in my ~/.gitconfig fixed it for me:

[merge]
        tool = mymeld
[mergetool "mymeld"]
        cmd = meld "$LOCAL" "$MERGED" "$REMOTE"

I'm using Arch, with:

$ git --version
git version 1.8.2
$ meld --version
meld 1.7.1
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Cosmin's solution works, but the $BASE file is updated--not $MERGED. This will update the $MERGED file:

Meld: v1.8.4

[merge]
  conflictstyle = diff3
  tool = mymeld
[mergetool "mymeld"]
  cmd = meld --auto-merge --output $MERGED $LOCAL $BASE $REMOTE --diff $BASE $LOCAL --diff $BASE $REMOTE
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I can confirm this.Saad's solution works for me on Ubuntu. As far as the original question goes this is the current correct answer. –  cosmin Mar 14 at 9:50
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Please see Saad's answer for the correct answer.

With meld 1.8.1 on Ubuntu I was getting the

wrong number of arguments supplied to --diff

and adding the --output before $MERGED fixed it for me:

[mergetool "mymeld"]
cmd = meld --diff $BASE $LOCAL --diff $BASE $REMOTE --diff $LOCAL $BASE $REMOTE --output $MERGED
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For some reason newest versions of meld does not display marker lines added for conflicts (<<<<<<<, =======, >>>>>>>) . If you want to see those lines, you should to install meld v 1.3.3 or previous.

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With Meld 1.7 the Solution by Tomek Bury does not work anymore.

The default settings didn't satisfy me:

Default settings

Instead for Meld >=1.7 I suggest one of two other solutions.

First solution:

 meld $LOCAL $BASE $REMOTE --auto-merge

first solution

Second solution:

 meld $LOCAL $BASE $REMOTE --auto-merge

second solution

.gitconfig

Copy & paste this in your .gitconfig file to get the solutions as described above:

[merge]
    tool = meld16
[mergetool "meld17"]
    # use this for Meld >=1.7
    # see http://stackoverflow.com/a/22911793/859591
    # second solution:
    cmd = meld $LOCAL $MERGED $REMOTE
    # first solution:
    #cmd = meld $LOCAL $BASE $REMOTE --auto-merge
[mergetool "meld16"]
    cmd = meld --diff $BASE $LOCAL --diff $BASE $REMOTE --diff $LOCAL $BASE $REMOTE --output $MERGED

[include]
    # requires git v1.7.10+
    path = .gitconfig.local

Copy & paste this in a .gitconfig.local file to set meld17 or meld16 only for this machine in case you use your .gitconfig on multiple machines:

# This is a host specific config file!
# Note that git 1.7.10+ is needed
# http://stackoverflow.com/a/9733277/859591
[merge]
    tool = meld17
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