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I have the following code:

// Dictionary which I want to optimize
Dictionary<string, MyClass> myDict;
//
Dictionary<int, KKSKey> kksKeyList;

...    
...
...

// Classes
[Serializable]
public class MyClass : MyBaseClass
{
    Dictionary<int, DebugValue> myDebugValues;    
    ...
    ...
    ...
}

//
[Serializable]
public class DebugValue
{
    public int ValueType {get;set;}
    public double Value {get;set;}
    ...
    ...
    ...
}

public class KKSKey
{
    public string KKS { set; get; }
    public string Variable { set; get; }
    ...
    ...
    ...
}

The reason I used dictionaries everywhere is because I need to access the lists by a key.

I have the following lines in a for loop that runs just over 550,000 (yes!) times. myDict has about 10,000 items and kksKeyList has over 550,000 items.

Each of the following lines runs for i = 0 to 550,000:

myDict[kksKeyList[i].KKS].myDebugValues[i].ValueType = DOUBLE;
myDict[kksKeyList[i].KKS].myDebugValues[i].Value = tempdouble;

Basically, the above lines are filling up the dictionary items with raw data received over TCP. Each one of the above line takes about 90-100 milliseconds per for loop (550,000 times). This is not acceptable for my application. It must complete one of above lines within 50 milliseconds. Can anyone suggest how to optimize the performance of above operation? I am open to any suggestions, even if it means redefining the related classes if necessary.

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What are DOUBLE and tempdouble? Are they constant? –  sloth Jun 21 '12 at 7:55
    
from the few that we see here I would say no, I cannot sugguest another approach (you could try to extrakt the multiple accesses to the dicts into seperate variables but I think the compiler will do so anyway if you let it optimize your code) - asside from this the only think I could think of is to parallize this (should be easy) or to try and shrink your 550.000 count somehow –  Carsten König Jun 21 '12 at 7:56
    
I'm having trouble trying to understand the problem you're trying to overcome with the solution provided in your question. Perhaps you can clarify exactly what you need with simpler names than KKSkey –  Polity Jun 21 '12 at 8:29
    
@BigYellowCactus, DOUBLE is an ENUM and tempdouble is a local double variable that holds the value received on TCP channel. –  silverspoon Jun 21 '12 at 23:40
    
@Polity, the problem with the approach that I am using as above is that this code takes about 90-100 ms/line to complete 550,000 iterations. I want to reduce that time to about 50 ms. –  silverspoon Jun 21 '12 at 23:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can try:

string kks = kksKeyList[i].KKS;
myDict[kks].myDebugValues[i].ValueType = DOUBLE;
myDict[kks].myDebugValues[i].Value = tempdouble;

or maybe:

myDict[kksKeyList[i].KKS] = new DebugValue(DOUBLE, tempdouble)

If it suits your constructor...

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I think that only reduces it from 6 Dictionary hits to 5 –  Jay Sullivan Jun 21 '12 at 8:00
    
or DebugValue v = myDict[kksKeyList[i].KKS] and v.ValueType=DOUBLE, v.Value = tempdouble if the constructor form is no good to you. –  Michael Anderson Jun 21 '12 at 8:04
    
has someone checked this? IMHO the complier will see this easy optimization anyhow –  Carsten König Jun 21 '12 at 8:34
1  
@Urik, your solution helped me. It definitely reduced the timing by about 25-30ms/line for 2 lines where I was having problem. Another thing that I changed was setting "myDict[kksKeyList[i].KKS].myDebugValues[i].ValueType" in the constructor instead of setting it in this big for loop. These 2 things worked quite well for me. Thanks a lot for your help! –  silverspoon Jun 25 '12 at 0:21

You timings are way too slow. A millisecond is an eternity with this kind of problem, and 550,000 elements in a dictionary is chicken feed. My first thought is that your problem is with your data source, not your Dictionaries; a millisecond is a lot more time in network communications.

If the dictionaries are the problem, take a look at your memory. Dictionaries are hash tables which are, essentially, arrays. When you create one, it starts out with an array of a certain size. As it expands, it allocates a new, larger array and throws away the old one. If your 550,000 element dictionary starts with room for 10 elements, it will leave "available" memory littered with big chunks of memory that can't be used because the next allocation is bigger still. The GC will work hard to rearrange memory and make all these blocks contiguous, and if it's doing this while you're running your two problem statements, it will slow things down. To fix this, first allocate space for 550,000 entries when you create the dictionary. That will probably be sufficient, but also call GC.Collect(). This will get the GC work out of the way in one go and give you clean timings when you want them.

Another memory problem may be myDebugValues. You've got one of these for each of the 550,000 entries in myDict. Just as you wanted myDict to be large right from the start, these need to be small. I might even suggest a ListDictionary or a HybridDictionary (System.Collections.Specialized).

The key thing with memory is to use only real memory rather than virtual; once your machine starts paging you're in trouble. And keep your GC happy.

Hope this helps, or else that someone else comes up with a better answer. (I liked Urik's, but the optimizers are probably doing that already.)

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your comment looks interesting. I will give it a try. Thanks! –  silverspoon Jun 25 '12 at 0:24

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