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A scenario with a HttpClient calling a ASP.NET Web API method, calling an EF repository. I am having trouble catching SQL exceptions.

Client:

try
{
  var client = new HttpClient();
  var httpRequestMessage = new HttpRequestMessage();
  var response = await client.SendAsync(httpRequestmessage);
  response.EnsureSuccessStatusCode();
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
  // internal error 500 here
}

Web API:

[HttpGet]
public IQueryable<Data> GetData()
{
  try
  {
    return repository.Data();
  }
  catch (Exception ex)
  {
     // Nothing here
  }
}

Repository:

public IQueryable<Data> GetData()
{
  try
  {
    return dbContext.Data.Where(d=>d.Id == 1)
  }
  catch (Exception ex)  
  {
    // nothing here
  }
}

How can I handle SQL Server Exceptions (such as connection issues)? Neither the API layer, nor the repository layer catches them. If I would turn the queryable into an Array in the repository:

var arr = dbContext.Data.Where(d => d.Id == 1).ToArray();

That would of course get caught. But how about the queryable scenario, how can I catch those?

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I assume you're getting a WebException on the client side. It may be possible to pull the response from the WebException and parse that to get an OData XML error. –  Stephen Cleary Jun 22 '12 at 0:43
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1 Answer

The reason you are not able to handle any exceptions is that IQueryable's generally have a lazy implementation. Nothing actual happens until you try to enumerate through them. If all you want to catch are query evaluation exceptions, you could use a simple trick by inheriting QueryableAttribute. Code follows,

public class QueryableWithExceptionAttribute : QueryableAttribute
{
    public override IQueryable ApplyQuery(IQueryable queryable, ODataQueryOptions queryOptions)
    {
        IQueryable result = base.ApplyQuery(queryable, queryOptions);
        try
        {
            result.GetEnumerator(); // eager evaluate to catch exceptions
        }
        catch(Exception)
        {
            // do stuff
        }

        return result;
    }
}

This would execute the query on the server and would fetch some results too I think. It still has the advantage/disadvantage of not fetching the entire result set which would mean that if you have a large result set and there are connection issues after the initial fetch, you wouldn't be able to catch those exceptions. It should be good enough for small result sets though. If you want a more robust solution, you could load the whole result set into memory by doing, result = LoadIntoMemory(result); instead of result.GetEnumerator();

    public static IQueryable LoadIntoMemory(IQueryable q)
    {
        MethodInfo mi = typeof(QueryableWithExceptionAttribute).GetMethod("LoadIntoMemoryInternal", BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Static);
        return mi.MakeGenericMethod(q.ElementType).Invoke(null, new[] { q }) as IQueryable;
    }

    private static IQueryable<T> LoadIntoMemoryInternal<T>(IQueryable<T> q)
    {
        return q.ToList().AsQueryable();
    }

This, of course, has the disadvantage of potentially using more memory.

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