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I'm converting a legacy webforms app to MVC, working through it a page at a time. To make the project easier to work with I've moved all the webforms pages, which were previously in the route of the project into a /webforms subdirectory. So I need to capture any incoming requests for /page.aspx?param=123 and redirect them to /webforms/page.aspx?param=123. I thought an easy way to do this would be to setup a route handler that passed any such requests to a controller that does that job. I set up a route like so:

    routes.MapRoute("WebformsRedirect", "{*page}",
            new { controller = "Webforms", action = "ForwardToPage" },
            new { page = @"\S+.aspx\S*" }
        );

This kind of works but it doesn't capture the query string, only the page part. I can get the query string for the Request object in the controller so it's not a huge deal but it would be nice to be able to do it through the route only. My routing unit tests (which I copied from Steve Sanderson's MVC book) actually pass correctly when I test them with querystrings so I'm confused why it isn't working. Is my regular expression wrong? They aren't my strong point.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

QueryStrings are not part of the routing

if you requested for example "Home/Index?foo=bar" and you have a route that match "Foo/Bar" to Controller Foo , Action Bar without any more routing info (don't know anything about foo) you still can write

class HomeController: Controller {
  ActionResult Index(string foo) {

  }
}

now foo variable will equal bar , why ? because its the model binder that gets the value of the parameters passed.

the model binder check 4 repositories by default QueryString , Routing Place Holders ,FormsCollections and Files

so what i am trying to say , the route and QueryStrings are two different things , it doesn't need to capture it

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Hmm, yeah I guess you are right, thanks. I was hoping that the wildcard would just capture everything but apparently not. –  Pete S Jun 21 '12 at 13:18
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