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I have a Java code where the return type of a function has unbounded wildcard type (?). How can I emulate something like this in C++? e.g.

    public GroupHandlerSetting<?> handleGroupProcessingFor(final EventHandler<T> eventHandler)
    {
        return new GroupHandlerSetting<T>(eventHandler, eventProcessors);
    }
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4  
And C++ templates are not even slightly like Java Generics. C++ templates create new types; Java Generics restricts existing types. C++ templates are basically a preprocess with some grafted-on type rules; Java Generics is built on type theory. Don't be seduced by the notation into thinking they are near-equivalents. They aren't. –  EJP Jun 21 '12 at 10:26
3  
Joshua Bloch states in various videos that wildcards should not be used for return types. Are you sure they are a good idea in your case? Can you post the function or at least its signature? –  FredOverflow Jun 21 '12 at 10:30
    
please, could you add the function? –  Alessandro Teruzzi Jun 21 '12 at 10:33
2  
@Jon: C++ templates are much more powerful than Java generics. Everything that can be done with generics can be done with templates, while the contrary does not hold. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 21 '12 at 10:37
1  
@polapts It's your job to properly specify your question. It's not the answerer's job to guess it. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jun 21 '12 at 11:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In C++ all type arguments must have a name, whether you use it or not, so there is no question mark. Just make it a template argument to the function and give it a name and you should be fine.

template <typename T>
struct templ {
   template <typename U>
   void assign( templ<U> & u );      // public void assign<?>( temple<U> u )      
};

That's the trivial part, the more complex part is enforcing constraints on the type, and for that you can use SFINAE:

template <typename T>
struct templ {
   template <typename U, typename _ = std::enable_if< 
                              typename std::is_base_of<U,T>::value
                                       >::type >
   void super( templ<U> & u );       // public void super_<? super T>( templ<?> u )

   template <typename U, typename _ = std::enable_if<
                              typename std::is_base_of<T,U>::value 
                                       >::type >
   void extends( templ<U> & u );     // public void extends_<? extends T>( templ<?> u )
}

That is using C++11 for the SFINAE, in C++03, it is a bit more convoluted (as if this version was simple) as you cannot use SFINAE on a function template argument, so SFINAE needs to be applied to either the return type or extra function arguments. SFINAE is a much more powerful solution, it can be used not only to provide super and extends but with many other features of types or compile time values. Google for SFINAE and you will find many cases of SFINAE being used, many of them will be C++03 style.

There was a proposal for concepts that would have greatly simplified the syntax, but no agreement was reached and in a move to push the standard to completion it was deferred for a later standard.

Now, this is really not that common in C++ as it is in Java, so I recommend that you provide a different question with what you want to do, and you will get ideas for designs in more idiomatic C++.

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2  
This isn't quite the same thing. Compare these two at the call site: ideone.com/2LXUp and ideone.com/bMMJr. If you want to emulate the wildcard, you need type erasure. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jun 21 '12 at 10:47
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes: Templates and generics are not the same thing, but you can implement all generic code that can be done with generics by using templates. As of your example, C++ does not support that particular code smell, note that experts in Java recommend not using ? in return statements, the reason is that the implementation of the method knows the type, so there is no reason not to publish it. The only advantage that ? provides in a return type is that you don't need to recompile callers if the callee returns a different type for the placeholder... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 21 '12 at 11:24
    
... but that is effectively useless in C++, as templates must be recompiled, so binary compatibility (and being able to use a crippled type at the call site --i.e. a type of which you know a couple of little features but which is effectively unknown to you) is not a feature. In your example, in the Java version, you are always returning an ArrayList<Integer>, so the equivalent example in C++ would be a plain non-generic function: std::vector<int> getSomeList(). In the question, the method is part of a generic class (guessing from T), thus a non-templated member function of a template. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 21 '12 at 11:25
    
... With that change the call site becomes much more similar in both languages: int x = getSomeList().size(); ouch, exactly the same! –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 21 '12 at 11:32
    
Yes, my example is trivial on purpose. But note that there are indeed uses of ? return types, even if rare. The Java standard library has an example in Object.getClass. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jun 21 '12 at 11:35

Your specific example is easily done, and since I don't use Java, I can't understand why it needs the <?> there. In C++, you just fill in the same template parameter:

template<class T>
GroupHandlerSetting<T> handleGroupProcessingFor(EventHandler<T> const& evHandler){
  return GroupHandlerSetting<T>(evHandler, evProcessors);
}

T will get deduced from whatever argument is passed to handleGroupProcessingFor, and we use just the same T for the return type, basically exactly what you do in the body of the function.

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I am not sure about this. If I could simply replace <?> with <T> then I think it's possible to do in Java also. Not sure why <?> is needed. I have little knowledge of Java so I might be wrong. –  polapts Jun 21 '12 at 10:55
1  
@polapts: Reading the comment on David's answer, it seems <?> is needed for type erasure. In your specific example, you can get away with simple argument deduction. –  Xeo Jun 21 '12 at 10:57
    
@Xeo: ? is a type placeholder, basically another type argument that you don't even care to name. You can place some constraints on what the unknown type is, namely you can require it to be a base or to derive from another type (whether generic argument or fixed type). The difference between your code and the question code is that in your code the type T is bound to be the same in both the argument and the return statement, while in the question's code it isn't (internally you could return GroupHandlerSetting<foo> regardless of T and it would compile. It is bad design though. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 21 '12 at 11:22

In Java you have all classes derived from java.lang.Object. So >>?<< means more or less java.lang.Object. If you want to emulate java and return the template for most base class - do something like the following:

int evProcessors;
template <class T>
class  EventHandler {};

template <class T>
class  GroupHandlerSetting;

class A { public: typedef A Root; };
class B : public A { public: typedef A Base; typedef A Root; }; 
class C : public B { public: typedef B Base; typedef B::Root Root; }; 
class D : public A { public: typedef A Base; typedef A Root; }; 

template <>
class GroupHandlerSetting<A> {
public:
   template <class U>
   GroupHandlerSetting (EventHandler<U> const& evHandler, int evProcessors) {}
   virtual ~GroupHandlerSetting() {}
};

template <class T>
class  GroupHandlerSetting : public GroupHandlerSetting<typename T::Base> {
  typedef GroupHandlerSetting<typename T::Base> Base;
public:
   template <class U>
   GroupHandlerSetting (EventHandler<U> const& evHandler, int evProcessors) : Base(evHandler, evProcessors) {}
};


template<class T>
GroupHandlerSetting<typename T::Root>* handleGroupProcessingFor(EventHandler<T> const& evHandler){
  return new GroupHandlerSetting<T>(evHandler, evProcessors);
}

int main() {
   GroupHandlerSetting<A>* s1 = handleGroupProcessingFor(EventHandler<D>());
   GroupHandlerSetting<A>* s2 = handleGroupProcessingFor(EventHandler<A>());
   delete s1;
   delete s2;
}
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Why the specialization? Why not just make a non-template AnyGroupHandlerSetting? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jun 21 '12 at 11:11
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes I changed a little the answer. You were right - in my previous answer it was really no sense for template specialization other than to look like Java. Now, I believe, it has more sense... –  PiotrNycz Jun 21 '12 at 11:23

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